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Foods rich in vital nutrients

Nuts are rich in calcium, copper, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, selenium, and zinc. Experts suggest that if you consume handful of nuts everyday its good for heart health. Since nuts are very high in calories, just having a handful of them is enough. High mineral nuts include almonds and cashews.

Beans are rich in copper, iron, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc. Beans and lentils are good sources of fiber and a good vegetarian substitute of protein. High mineral beans include white beans, soybeans, chickpeas (garbanzo), and kidney beans.

Dark Leafy Green vegetables are rich in calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. They contain minimal calories and are good for obese people. High mineral dark leafy green vegetables include spinach, and turnip greens.

Mushrooms are rich in copper, potassium, selenium, and zinc. Mushrooms are exceptionally low in calories, and you can have them with a homemade vegetable recipe or simply add it so some salad to get its maximum benefits.

Fish is rich in calcium, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and selenium. It is also rich in protein, and heart healthy omega 3 fatty acids. Fish rich in minerals include salmon, tuna, and mackerel. Fish oil is also high in omega 3 fatty acids that are good for your heart health.

Healthy food in winters

Root vegetables like beets, carrots and turnips grow in plenty during winter season. Carrots are rich in beta-carotene that has exceptional health benefits to your body. Vitamin C helps can help in boosting your immunity and vitamin A is good for eye health.

Oatmeal is much more than just a convenient breakfast food; it also provides nutrients that are essential during winter. Oatmeal is high in zinc (important for proper immune function) and soluble fiber. Having an oatmeal breakfast with nuts provides you with essential nutrients and energy during winters.

Mixed vegetable or chicken soup is winter’s perfect food. But soup with minimal amount of cream and salt is more beneficial. Pair your soup with a side of 100 percent whole grain crackers. Homemade soups are the best as they are low in calories and are full of essential micronutrients that are good for health.

Cold and flu are common in winters, to prevent risk eat lots of cruciferous vegetables that boosts your defense system in winters. Broccoli and cauliflower are both high in vitamin C, which is associated with enhanced immune function. Try to buy and consume fresh broccoli and cauliflower.

Fish like salmon or tuna are good sources of vitamin D. During the winter months, when you have limited exposure to the sun, food sources containing high amounts of Vitamin D are more essential for daily intake. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with impaired growth, weakening of the bones and even the risk of heart disease. So having fish has great effects on our body during winters.

Foods rich in antioxidants

Kidney beans-All kinds of beans – black, pinto, red and kidney beans are high-octane sources of antioxidants. Beans are also rich in muscle-boosting protein, have no cholesterol and little fat. Combing them with grains helps in making a complete protein meal.

Raisins-If you’re looking to load up on antioxidants, have a handful of raisins. Dark raisins are packed with anthocyanins that give you an energy boost.  Sprinkle them on your breakfast oats, add them in a salad or blend some with your smoothie. 

Barley-This ancient grain is trending again and for good reason. Barley is known for its powerful antioxidant properties that make you stronger from within. Also, it has been found that when grains like barley are soaked and sprouted the antioxidant levels increase. 

Tomatoes-Juicy tomatoes are packed with three types of antioxidants – Lycopene (that gives tomato its bright red colour), Vitamin C and Vitamin A. Vitamin C is one of the most potent kinds of antioxidants that you can derive from fruits and vegetables. The lycopene in tomatoes is best absorbed when they are cooked.