Bee Stings/ Insect Bite

Bee Stings/ Insect Bite by Famhealth

Not all bites or stings are the same. You will need different first aid treatment and medical care depending on what type of creature has bitten or stung you. Some species can cause more damage than others. Some people also have allergies that raise the risk of a serious reaction. Here’s how to recognize and treat the symptoms of bites and stings from insects, spiders, and snakes.

Common Symptoms

The common symptoms are redness, swelling of face, lips or throat, pain, itching, hives, abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting, breathing problems and shock.

First aid treatment

If someone shows signs of a severe allergic reaction, help them get emergency medical attention and follow the steps in the next section. If they show no signs of a severe reaction, treat the site of the bite or sting for minor symptoms:

Step 1:

If the insect’s stinger is still embedded in their skin, remove it by gently scraping a flat-edged object, such as a credit card, across their skin. Avoid using tweezers to remove the stinger, since squeezing it may release more venom.

Step 2:

Wash the area of the bite with soap and water.

Step 3:

Place a cold compress or ice pack on the area for about 10 minutes at a time to help reduce pain and swelling. Wrap any ice or ice packs in a clean cloth to protect their skin.

Step 4:

Apply calamine lotion or a paste of baking soda and water to the area several times a day to help relieve itching and pain. Calamine lotion is a type of antihistamine cream.

Emergency treatment for a severe allergic reaction

If you suspect someone may be having a severe allergic reaction:

  • Ask someone else to call emergency services, right away. If you’re alone, contact emergency services before you provide other treatment.
  • Ask the person whether they carry an epinephrine auto-injector. If they do, retrieve it for them and help them use it according to the label directions.
  • Encourage them to remain calm, lie down quietly with their legs elevated, and stay still. If they start to vomit, turn them onto their side to allow the vomit to drain and prevent choking.
  • If they become unconscious and stop breathing, begin CPR. Continue it until medical help arrives.

To avoid making matters worse, don’t apply a tourniquet. You should also avoid giving them anything to eat or drink.

To read more on First Aid, click on the link below.

First Aid

Nose Bleed

First Aid: Handling a Nose Bleed by Famhealth

A NOSE BLEED is bleeding from the nose that commonly occurs when tiny blood vessels inside the nose are ruptured.

Treatment of Nose Bleed: 

To control the blood loss and to maintain an open airway

Procedure:

Sit up straight and tip your head slightly forward.

Note: Do not tilt your head back. This may cause blood to run down the back of your throat, and you may swallow it. Swallowed blood can irritate your stomach and cause vomiting. And vomiting may make the bleeding worse or cause it to start again. Spit out any blood that gathers in your mouth and throat rather than swallowing it.

Use your thumb and forefinger to firmly pinch the soft part of your nose shut. The nose consists of a hard, bony part and a softer part made of cartilage. Nose bleeds usually occur in the soft part of the nose. Spraying the nose with a medicated nasal spray (such as Afrin) before applying pressure may help stop a nosebleed. You will have to breathe through your mouth.

Apply an ice pack to your nose and cheeks. Cold will constrict the blood vessels and help stop the bleeding.

Keep pinching for a full 10 minutes. Use a clock to time the 10 minutes. It can seem like a long time. Resist the urge to peek after a few minutes to see if your nose has stopped bleeding.

Check to see if your nose is still bleeding after 10 minutes. If it is, hold it for 10 more minutes. Most nosebleeds will stop after 10 to 20 minutes of direct pressure.

Put a thin layer of a saline- or water-based nasal gel, such as NasoGel, or an antiseptic nasal cream inside your nose. Do not blow your nose or put anything else inside your nose for at least 12 hours after the bleeding has stopped.

Rest quietly for a few hours.

Conclusion:

 Proper management of nose bleed should  be applied to prevent prolonged bleeding

If the bleeding is severe or lasts longer than 30 minutes ,send the casuality to the hospital immediately.

To read more on First Aid, click on the link below.

First Aid

$("#ig").attr('disabled','disabled');
$("#ig1").attr('disabled','disabled');