First Aid for Drowning

First Aid for Drowning by Famhealth

Get Help

  • Notify a lifeguard, if one is close. If not, ask someone to call 102 ,108.
  • If you are alone, follow the steps below.

Move the Person

  • Take the person out of the water.

Check for Breathing

  • Place your ear next to the person’s mouth and nose. Do you feel air on your cheek?
  • Look to see if the person’s chest is moving.

If the Person is Not Breathing, Check Pulse

  • Check the person’s pulse for 10 seconds.

If There is No Pulse, Start CPR

  • Carefully place person on back.
  • For an adult or child, place the heel of one hand on the center of the chest at the nipple line. You can also push with one hand on top of the other. For an infant, place two fingers on the breastbone.
  • For an adult or child, press down at least 2 inches. Make sure not to press on ribs. For an infant, press down about 1 and 1/2 inches. Make sure not to press on the end of the breastbone.
  • Do chest compressions only, at the rate of 100-120 per minute or more. Let the chest rise completely between pushes.
  • Check to see if the person has started breathing.

Repeat if Person Is Still Not Breathing

  • If you’ve been trained in CPR, you can now open the airway by tilting the head back and lifting the chin.
  • Pinch the nose of the victim closed. Take a normal breath, cover the victim’s mouth with yours to create an airtight seal, and then give 2 one-second breaths as you watch for the chest to rise.
  • Give 2 breaths followed by 30 chest compressions.

Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation for a drowning victim :

  • Turn the drowning person’s head to the side, allowing any water to drain from his or her mouth and nose. Turn the head back to the center.
  • Begin mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on land, if possible, or in the water if the injured person needs immediate life-and-death measures.
  • Strongly breathe four times into the mouth of the injured person as you pinch his or her nose. This helps air get past any water that is clogging the breathing passageways and the lungs.
  • After four strong breaths, put your ear near the mouth and watch the chest for any breathing movement.
  1. Check the pulse for signs of life.
  2. Repeat the cycle.

***You’re not out of the water once the drowning victim starts to breathe and choke. In fact, the first 48 hours after a drowning incident can be the most dangerous. Complications resulting from water exposure—pneumonia, infection, heart failure—can all occur during this time. Therefore, you should always take a drowning victim to the hospital.

To read more on First Aid, click on the link below.

https://famhealth.in/infocus-detail/first-aid


How to Remove Water from your Ear

How to Remove Water from your Ear by Famhealth

If water does get trapped in your ear, you can try several at-home remedies for relief:

Jiggle your earlobe

This first method may shake the water out of your ear right away. Gently tug or jiggle your earlobe while tilting your head in a downward motion toward your shoulder. You can also try shaking your head from side to side while in this position.

Make gravity do the work

With this technique, gravity should help the water drain from your ear.Lie on your side for a few minutes, with your head on a towel to absorb the water. The water may slowly drain out of your ear.

Create a vacuum

This method will create a vacuum that may draw the water out.

  • Tilt your head sideways, and rest your ear onto your cupped palm, creating a tight seal.
  • Gently push your hand back and forth toward your ear in a rapid motion, flattening it as you push and cupping it as you pull away.
  • Tilt your head down to allow the water to drain.

Apply a hot compress

  • Using hot but not scalding water, wet a washcloth. Make sure to wring out the washcloth before using it so that it doesn’t drip.
  • Tilt head downward on the affected side and apply the cloth to the outside of the ear. Leave it on the ear for about 30 seconds, and then remove it for a minute.
  • Repeat these steps four or five times. It may help to sit up or lie down on the side opposite of the affected side of your body afterward.

Use a blow dryer

The heat from the dryer can help evaporate the water inside the ear canal.

  • Set the blow dryer to its lowest setting.
  • Hold the hair dryer about a foot away from the ear and move it in a back-and-forth motion.
  • While tugging down on the earlobe, let the warm air blow into the ear.

Try alcohol and vinegar eardrops

The alcohol can help evaporate the water in your ear. Alcohol also works to eliminate the growth of bacteria, which can help prevent infection. If the trapped water occurs due to earwax buildup, the vinegar may help remove it.

  • Combine equal parts alcohol and vinegar to make eardrops.
  • Using a sterile dropper, apply three or four drops of this mixture into the ear.
  • Gently rub the outside of the ear.
  • Wait 30 seconds, and tilt the head sideways to let the solution drain out.

Use hydrogen peroxide eardrops

Hydrogen peroxide can help clear debris, earwax, bacteria, or trapped water from your ear.

  • Using a clean dropper, place three to four drops of hydrogen peroxide into your ear.
  • Wait two to three minutes.
  • Tilt the affected side downward, allowing the fluid to drain out.

Don’t use this method if you think you have any of these conditions:

  • an outer ear infection, perforated eardrum and eardrum tubes.

Try olive oil

Olive oil can also help prevent ear infection, as well as repel water out.

  • Warm some olive oil in a small bowl.
  • Using a clean dropper, place a few drops of the oil into the affected ear.
  • Lie on the  other side for about 10 minutes, and then sit up and tilt the ear downward. The water and oil should drain out.

Yawn or chew

When water gets stuck, moving your mouth can sometimes help to open the tubes. Yawn or chew gum to relieve tension in your Eustachian tubes.

Perform the Valsalva maneuver

This method can also help open closed eustachian tubes. Be careful not to blow too hard. This can damage your ear drum.

  • Close your mouth and gently squeeze your nostrils shut with your fingers.
  • Breathe deeply, and slowly blow the air out of the nose. If popping sound noticed,  it means the Eustachian tubes have opened.
  • Tilt your head to allow the water to drain from your ear.

Use steam

Warm steam can help release water from your middle ear through your eustachian tubes. Try taking a hot shower, or giving yourself a mini sauna with a bowl of hot water.

  • Fill a large bowl with hot steaming water.
  • Cover your head with a towel to keep the steam in, and hold your face over the bowl.
  • Inhale the steam for 5 or 10 minutes, and then tilt your head to the side to drain your ear.
  • 12. Try more water

This technique may sound illogical, but it can actually help draw water out of your ear.

  • Lying on your side, fill the affected ear with water using a clean dropper.
  • Wait five seconds and then turn over, with the affected ear facing down. All of the water should drain out.

To read more on First Aid, click on the link below.

First Aid

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