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Foods to stay healthy by Famhealth

Cereals are rich source of calcium, iron, and vitamin B. A cereal, which is coarser and grainier, is considered more healthy and nutritious. Experts say that a good cereal meal provides you with essential nutrients like carbohydrates, fats and proteins.

Eat lots of fruits and vegetables- Eating lots of fresh fruits and vegetables are rich in fiber and essential micronutrients.  Do you know the more colorful the fruits, denser the nutrient. Eating five portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables is considered good for health.

To stay healthy, we need some fats in our diet; however consuming a fatty diet is harmful to our body. Experts suggest that the limited intake of saturated fat rich food items like ghee, butter, coconut oil etc. minimizes the risk of heart diseases and high blood cholesterol levels.

It is said that drinking about 8- 10 liters of water every day keeps the body hydrated. However; during summers or if you have an active lifestyle it is good to drink more water. Soft and fizzy drinks that are high in added sugar cannot replace the good benefits of water.

Experts say that exercise is the cornerstone of healthy living. Performing a 30 to 45 min daily exercise and sports like swimming, aerobics, power yoga etc. has shown good effects on our body.

Does Your Daily Diet Contain These 5 Essential Micronutrients?

Essential Micronutrients by Famhealth

1. Folate  


Folate is one of the eight types of B vitamins, and it helps with the formation of red blood cells. It is water-soluble, and also called vitamin B9. The best way to get your B9 is through fruits and vegetables. Legumes like lentils and beans, spinach and asparagus are all great, folate-rich options.


2. Iron


Iron is used to create hemoglobin, which is the substance in red blood cells that carries and delivers oxygen around the body. There are two types of iron: heme, which comes from an animal source, and non-heme, which is obtained through a plant. Non-heme sources are beans, chickpeas, lentils, tofu, broccoli and spinach.


3. Magnesium


Did you know that consuming sodas, sugar and caffeine actually causes your body to lose magnesium? Good sources of magnesium are dark leafy vegetables like spinach. Nuts and seeds, such as almonds, cashews, sesame and pumpkin seeds; and whole, unrefined grains like brown rice are storehouse of magnesium.


4. Vitamin A


Essential for maintaining vision, vitamin A describes a group of fat-soluble retinoids, like retinol. Retinol is created from carotenoids, such as beta-carotene, which is often associated with foods of an orange hue such as carrots. Other sources come from animals, and can be found in foods like liver, grass-fed dairy products and egg yolks.


5. Vitamin D


The deficiency of this vitamin is linked to rising levels of depression and autoimmune disorders, laying the foundation for many chronic illnesses. Natural sources are fatty fish and fish oils, canned tuna, egg yolks, mushrooms, and tofu.

Dealing with Pain

Pain from cancer or from the treatments can affect normal day-to-day activities and cause trouble in sleeping and eating and even result in feeling irritable, frustrated, sad and angry. The good news is that all pain can be treated and most pain can be controlled or relieved. When pain is controlled, people can sleep and eat better, enjoy being with family and friends, and continue with their work and hobbies.

Pain is most often caused by cancer itself. The amount of pain depends on the type of cancer, its stage, and the patient’s pain threshold. People in an advanced stage of cancer are more likely to have pain which can be caused by a tumor pressing on bones, nerves or body organs. Surgery is often part of the treatment for cancers and some amount of pain is usually expected. Pain due to surgery can last from a few days to a few weeks, depending on the type of surgery.
When a tumor spreads to the spine, it can press on the spinal cord and cause spinal cord compression. At other times, cancer spreads to the bones causing bone pain which can be treated through external radiation.

Some tests used to diagnose cancer can cause pain and is usually relieved after the procedure. Even when you are told that the pain from the procedure can’t be avoided or that it won’t last long, you can ask for pain medicine if you need it. The type of pain you have determines the type of treatment. Chronic pain can usually be controlled by taking pain medicines on a regular schedule. People with chronic pain can also have breakthrough pain which varies in intensity and usually cannot be predicted. It typically “breaks through” the pain relief they were getting from regular pain medicine.

Phantom pain is a longer-lasting effect of surgery, beyond the usual surgical pain. If you’ve had an arm, leg, or even a breast removed, you may still feel pain or other unusual or unpleasant feelings that seem to be coming from the absent (phantom) body part. Other types of pain are:

  • Peripheral neuropathy (PN). Burning, tingling, numbness,   weakness, clumsiness, trouble walking, or unusual sensations in  the hands and arms and/or legs and feet are the main signs
  • Peripheral neuropathy is due to nerve damage caused by certain types of chemotherapy, by vitamin deficiencies, cancer, and other problems.
  • Mouth sores (stomatitis or mucositis). Chemotherapy can cause sores and pain in the mouth and throat. The pain can cause people to have trouble eating, drinking, and even talking.
  • Radiation mucositis and other radiation injuries can cause skin burns, mucositis (mouth sores), and scarring – all of which can cause pain. The throat, intestine, and bladder are also prone to radiation injury, and you may have pain if these areas are treated.

To read more on Cancer, click on the link below, 

Cancer