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Food facts on starchy food 

Minimize the intake of white bread; as it is high in calories and carbs, but low in fiber, protein and nutrients. The simple starches in bread are digested so quickly that they spike your glucose levels just like sugar — and leave you hungry soon afterward. So these foods should be avoided to prevent weight gain and other health concerns like diabetes.

Limit white rice as they are less in fiber and protein but simply are loaded with empty calories. White rice is quickly digested and absorbed, making your blood sugar rise faster. White rice should be avoided if you are diagnosed with prediabetes or if your family has a history of diabetes. If rice is your staple diet try replacing it with brown rice as they are healthier and has more nutrition benefits.

Skinless white potatoes have a very high glycemic index — meaning they raise your blood sugar quickly. So, however you like your potatoes, try to incorporate their skin. The skin’s fiber will slow your digestion and keep you full longer. (You’ll benefit from potatoes’ potassium, phosphorus, and vitamins B and C, too). Try making mashed potatoes with the skin on.

Avoid processed cereals like maida as they are starchier. The more processed a grain is the more unhealthy and calorie leaden it is. Try to consume cereals which have a bigger grain size. Just for an instance atta is more nutritious and healthier than maida. Gram flour is healthier than besan.

Pasta and chips are high in starch which is digested quickly and are low in essential nutrients. You can try for a whole wheat pasta or bean pastas. Their fiber will leave you feeling full for longer. If you want to enjoy crackers, choose whole-grain varieties. Look for brands with minimal added sugar and ingredients.

Easy tips for Living Healthy

Easy tips for Living Healthy by Famhealth
  • Minimize the intake of white bread; as it is high in calories and carbs, but low in fiber, protein and nutrients. The simple starches in bread are digested so quickly that they spike your glucose levels just like sugar — and leave you hungry soon afterward. So these foods should be avoided to prevent weight gain and other health concerns like diabetes.
  • Limit white rice as they are less in fiber and protein but simply are loaded with empty calories. White rice is quickly digested and absorbed, making your blood sugar rise faster. White rice should be avoided if you are diagnosed with prediabetes or if your family has a history of diabetes. If rice is your staple diet try replacing it with brown rice as they are healthier and has more nutrition benefits.
  • Skinless white potatoes have a very high glycemic index — meaning they raise your blood sugar quickly. So, however you like your potatoes, try to incorporate their skin. The skin’s fiber will slow your digestion and keep you full longer. (You’ll benefit from potatoes’ potassium, phosphorus, and vitamins B and C, too). Try making mashed potatoes with the skin on.
  • Avoid processed cereals like maida as they are starchier. The more processed a grain is the more unhealthy and calorie leaden it is. Try to consume cereals which have a bigger grain size. Just for an instance atta is more nutritious and healthier than maida. Gram flour is healthier than besan.
  • Pasta and chips are high in starch which is digested quickly and are low in essential nutrients. You can try for a whole wheat pasta or bean pastas. Their fiber will leave you feeling full for longer. If you want to enjoy crackers, choose whole-grain varieties. Look for brands with minimal added sugar and ingredients.

The Correlation Between Diabetes And Food by Famhealth

The Correlation Between Diabetes And Food

The Correlation Between Diabetes And Food by Famhealth

The Correlation Between Diabetes And Food by Famhealth

As Diabetes is a disorder due to the body’s inability to process sugar, there is a direct and intrinsic relationship between Diabetes and food. In fact, managing food intake is also one of the first steps in managing and living with Diabetes.

Once you have received a positive diagnosis for Diabetes, one of the first things the doctors advise is managing your diet and nutrition. At this point, it’s helpful to become aware of the term “Glycaemic Index” and what that means for your diet plan. Glycaemic Index is a value associated with food items that indicates the food’s effect on an individual’s blood glucose levels.

Selecting the right food items by checking out their Glycaemic Indices is very important in managing Diabetes with diet and nutrition. Choice of low glycaemic value foods can help you come out a winner and stay on top of your condition!

What to eat?

One of the first questions that comes to the mind of people and families living with Diabetes is: “What to eat?” The good news is, people living with Diabetes can, in fact, eat almost anything, as long as it is in small portions, barring selected high processed sugar items, discussed in our food corner of Famhealth,s diabetes community.

The term “diet plan” can be a stress point in itself, as it hints at the need to change established eating patterns. However, if you have been diagnosed with Diabetes, this is one stress you need not take, as the “Diabetes diet plans” are some of the healthiest plans and can easily be followed by anyone, with the possible exception of small children.

In fact, there are no specific, rigid meal plans that are to be followed. People living with Diabetes can eat almost anything –moderately.

Do you want to control fluctuation in your blood glucose levels? 

Sometimes you will note your blood sugar levels are fluctuating form high to low. There is a simple reason behind this – chances are there is something that you have been eating that is not fitting in with the management of your condition.

Blood sugars are affected by many things that include the food you ate, how long ago you ate, your physical activity, stress levels, sleep patterns, and your emotional wellbeing. If you use Insulin to address these fluctuations, chances are you may get stuck in a high-low cycle that is bad for your long-term health.

It is a good idea to keep a daily record of your meals and physical activity levels as it has an impact on how stable your blood sugar levels are. People with diabetes need to eat small meals frequently, especially when they are on medications such as Insulin, to watch out for low blood glucose levels. According to the American Diabetes Association, a daily intake of 1400-1500 calories is a must, in accordance with the individual’s BMI and physical activity levels.

Do check with your doctor about how much activity and how many calories your body needs daily as you plan your diet and exercise routine. An ideal diabetes meal includes a variety of low carbohydrates, proteins, fibrous non-starchy fruits and vegetables. However, before we delve into the list of suitable food items, let us take a quick look at the myths and facts surrounding Diabetes-friendly foods.

Smart Eating Strategies

  • Keep a Food Diary
    • One of the smartest ways to manage your condition is to record what you are eating throughout the day. Leading dieticians around the world recommend keeping a detailed record of what you are eating so as to better understand how they impact your condition. Studies in United Kingdom confirm that people who maintained food records lose the extra weight, and keep it off better than people who did not record their intake.
  • Watch your food labels
    • Want to grab your favourite drink or take a bite of the potato chips? It is a good idea to read the nutritional information given on the package label. Knowing the calorie content and glycaemic index can get a little cumbersome, but research suggests that awareness of the calorie content and sugar levels helps people living with Diabetes keep track of unsuitable food items that may spike their blood glucose levels.
  • Start with a good breakfast
    • Starting the day with a good breakfast powers you up with energy and helps you maintain your blood glucose levels throughout the day. There is enough research out there to support this statement. The old saying “breakfast like a king” stands correct if you choose low carb breads & cereals, fresh juices, boiled eggs, nuts, oats, yogurt, cheese, and milk.
  • Eat by the plate method
    • This is an interesting method advocated by ADA, which subscribes filling half of your plate with non-starchy fruits and vegetables, one fourth of your plate with lean proteins such as grilled fish or chicken and the balance with low carbs. This is a popular model which not only aids in weight loss, but also keeps the blood glucose levels under check.
  • Carb counting
    • Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is not a diet plan, it is a meal planning strategy for people with Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrates in the foods that you eat every day.
      Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks. Completely cutting down on carbs may lead to fatigue and restlessness. One must choose wisely and replace unhealthy carbs with Diabetes-friendly and healthy low-carb foods.
      According to National Institute of Health, USA, healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains as well as fruits and vegetables are a vital part of a healthy eating plan as they provide both energy and nutrients such as vitamins & minerals and most importantly fibre. Fibre can help in preventing constipation, lowering cholesterol levels, and controlling your weight.
      Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients and they often spike your blood glucose levels leading to poor diabetes management.
  • Eat more small meals
    • People with diabetes should eat four to five small meals during the day, instead of three large meals according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Eating small meals allows the body to replenish itself, while at the same time slower, continuous absorption of food prevents cravings and hunger pangs. Among the benefits associated with this are decreased blood sugar levels after meals, reduced insulin requirements during the course of the day, weight loss and lower blood cholesterol levels.
  • Always stock up your refrigerator
    • Stocking up your refrigerator with healthy food items is all about keeping your supplies ready. This prevents you from eating high calorie and sugary food items when you feel hungry or have any cravings. You can choose from a wide variety of fruits, nuts, cheese, and low carb multigrain breads and protein shakes to quickly make mini-meals and avoid binging. 

To read more on Diabetes, click on the link below. 

Diabetes Types & symptoms

Diabetes Recipe – Chicken with Cherry-Pepper Relish

Diabetes Recipe - Chicken with Cherry-Pepper Relish

Preparation :20 Minutes

Cooking :8 Minutes

Serves :4

Ingredients

  • Olive oil 1 tablespoon
  • 4 small skinless, boneless chicken breast halves (1 to 1¼ pounds total)
  • 1/3 cup bottled roasted red bell peppers, drained and finely chopped
  • 1/3 cup frozen unsweetened pitted dark sweet cherries, finely chopped1-ounce semisoft cheddar cheese crumbled
  • 1 tablespoon snipped fresh garlic chives

Directions

  • Coat an unheated large non-stick frying pan with cooking oil; heat over medium flame. Sprinkle chicken with ¼ teaspoon each salt and black pepper. Add chicken to the frying pan. Cook for 8 to 10 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink (165o), turning once.
  • Meanwhile, in a bowl stir together the roasted peppers, cherries and 1/8 teaspoon salt.
  • Transfer chicken to 4 serving plates. Top with a pepper-cherry mixture, cheddar and garlic chives.
Nutrition Facts
Makes 4 servings (Amount per Serving)
Calories (Kcal) 124
Protein (g)18
Carbohydrates (g)4
Total Sugars (g)2
Dietary Fibre (g)2
Total Fat (g)2
Saturated Fat (g)324

Note

Remember to manage your portion sizes. Recommended portion size should not exceed 2 servings/helpings. Consuming diabetes friendly recipes in inappropriate portion sizes may lead to spiking of your blood glucose levels.

For more related recipes, click the link below.

https://famhealth.in/infocus-detail/diabetes

Papaya And Coconut Smoothie

Diabetes Recipe - Papaya And Coconut Smoothie by Famhealth
Nutrition Facts
Makes 2 servings(Amount per Serving)
Calories (Kal)                                 205.4                             
Protein (g)4.6               
Carbohydrates (g)32.9               
Total Sugars (g)20.4                
Dietary Fibre (g)4.1              
Fat (g)7.7               
Saturated Fat (g)5.6                

Serves: 2, Time taken: 5 minutes

1 Ripe papaya, peeled, seeded and cut into chunks

2 Oranges, juiced

½ Banana, cut into chunks

90g/3 oz silken tofu

60ml/2 fl oz (4tbsp) Coconut milk

1 tsp grated root ginger

Steps:

  1. Put the papaya, orange juice, banana, tofu, coconut milk and root ginger into the blender.
  2. Blend until smooth and serve immediately. (This is also very refreshing on a hot day if you freeze the papaya chunks and banana first)

Note: Papayas are particularly rich in vitamins C and are also a useful source of antioxidants and fibre. They also contain an enzyme called papain which breaks down protein. In Chinese medicine, papayas have traditionally been given to those who find it difficult to digest protein-rich foods.

The combination of papaya, orange juice and banana delivers quite a high glycemic load, which is why we have added some tofu. It would be wise to eat a protein food alongside this too, such as poached and scrambled eggs without the toast, or a piece of fish.

For more related recipes, click o the link below.

Diabetes

Diabetes Recipe – Hearty Chicken Stew

Diabetes Recipe - Hearty Chicken Stew by Famhealth

Preparation :25 Minutes

Cooking :27 Minutes

Serves :4

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 4 skinless, boneless chicken thigh cut into 11/2-inch pieces (1 pound)
  • 4 medium carrots, thinly sliced (2 cups)
  • 2 stalks celery, thinly sliced (1 cup)
  • 2 medium spring onion, thinly sliced (2/3 cup)
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 medium round red potato, cubed (3/4 cup)
  • 1 cup frozen cut green beans
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ½ cup fat-free milk
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • Cracked black pepper

Directions

  • Heat oil over medium flame. Add chicken, carrots, celery, spring onion, and garlic. Cook and stir for 5 to 8 minutes or until chicken is brown on all sides and vegetables are cooked. Stir in chicken broth, potato, green beans and ground black pepper.
  • Bring the broth to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 20 to 25 minutes or until vegetables are tender and chicken is no longer pink.
  • Meanwhile, in a small bowl whisk together milk and flour until smooth. Stir mixture into cooked stew mixture. Return to boiling; reduce heat. Cook and stir about 2 minutes or until mixture is thickened. Serve the stew into four bowls. Sprinkle each serving with cracked black pepper.
Nutrition Facts
Make 4 servings (Amount per serving)
Calories (Kcal)269
Protein (g)27
Carbohydrates (g)24
Total Sugars (g)8
Cholesterol(mg)108
Total fat (g)8
Sodium (mg)462


Note

Remember to manage your portion sizes. Recommended portion size should not exceed 2 servings/helpings. Consuming diabetes friendly recipes in inappropriate portion sizes may lead to spiking of your blood glucose levels.Note

For more related recipes, click the link below.

Diabetes

Diabetes Recipe – Chiang Mai Chicken Curry

Diabetes: Chiang Mai Chicken Curry by Famhealth
Nutrition Facts
Makes 4 servings (Amount per Serving)
Calories (kcal)                                                       518.8                  
Protein (g)                                         48.9
Carbohydrates (g)26.9
Total Sugars (g)4.4
Dietary Fibre (g)3.1
Fat (g)24.9
Saturated Fat (g)10.1

For the curry paste: 2 tsp Coriander seeds

1 tsp Cumin seeds

3 Cloves

2 Cardamom pods

1 Star anise

5 Dried long red chillies, deseeded, soaked and drained

Pinch of salt

3 tbsp Lemongrass, chopped

5cm/2” piece fresh root ginger’ chopped

1 tsp Turmeric

4 Shallots, chopped

6 Garlic cloves, peeled and chopped

For the curry: 1 Organic, free-range chicken, about 1.6 kg/3½ lbs

2 Garlic cloves, peeled

2 cm/1” piece Fresh ginger root, peeled

2 tbsp Coconut oil

12 Shallots, peeled

2 tbsp Cashew nuts

2 tbsp Fish sauce

Water or chicken stock to cover

Steps:

  1. First, dry the coriander seeds, star anise, cumin seeds, whole cloves and cardamom pods in a small dry pan until fragrant. When cooled, remove the cardamom seeds and discard the pods. Grind the spices in pestle and mortar. Combine these with the other curry paste ingredients and mix to a paste either in a mortar or in a food processor.
  2. Wash the chicken, joint into 8 pieces and remove the skin. Mash the garlic cloves and ginger to make a paste. In a large pan, heat the coconut oil and fry the garlic and ginger paste until golden. Add the curry paste and chicken and simmer for several minutes, turning frequently. Add the whole shallots and cashew nuts. Season with fish sauce. Cover with stock or water and simmer for at least 30 minutes, or until the chicken is tender.

Note: The combination of chicken and nuts gives this dish a very high magnesium content (125g per serving). Magnesium is key mineral for diabetics: and it has been shown that people with low magnesium are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes.

For more related recipes, click o the link below.

Diabetes

6 best alternatives: diabetes sugar cravings

Johnny Johnny yes papa … eating sugar no papa, open your mouth ha ha ha. Isn’t this famous old poem “so true” for many of us? Well, sugar cravings can be smartly handled and satisfied by natural effective alternatives, read on to find out.

 

Indulge in fresh and seasonal fruits:


  

Eating fruits is not only beneficial for your health, but the natural “fructose” content in fruits satisfy your “sugar cravings” too. Fresh and seasonal fruits like berries, avocado, cherries, pear, apples, grapes, mangoes, bananas, pomegranate, kiwi etc…. are readily available in the market and can be used as fillers/minimeals in diabetes diet plans. Adding fruits to your cornflakes for breakfast can be a great way to replace sugars totally. But remember packed and processed fruits should be avoided as they carry “hidden sugars” which may spike your blood glucose level.

 

Add Flavour to your meals:


  

Spices and herbs can do wonders to your diabetes meals. Why stick with the bland and boring taste, spice up your meals. Add a pinch of cardamom, cloves, turmeric, cumin, white pepper, black pepper, red dried chill or chilli flakes etc and have a great tasty meal. This will not only satisfy your taste buds but also keep you away from sugar cravings.

 

Looking for a drink?


  

Do you quench your thirst with high sugar aerated drinks? Replace it with low fat milk, fruit juices, coconut water (rich in minerals and antioxidants) or simply water. Quenching your thirst with water is the best way to cut out on sugar and calories. Research hints replacing high sugar drinks and mock tails with non-soda drinks not only help you curb sugar cravings but also helps the extra calories away.

 

Aroma & beverages


  

We all love our tea’s and coffees’. Mostly we are recommended by our dieticians to consume it minus the “sugars” but did you know adding aroma to beverages can curb sugar cravings. Scientific studies reveal that adding jasmine leaves or cardamom powder in your tea can curb sugar cravings to a larger extent.

 

Reward yourself


  

There will be occasions where you will want to pamper yourself, research hints a tiny portion of “dark chocolate” rich with cocoa will not only satisfy your “sugar tooth” but also help you in keeping your sugar cravings under control. Scientific studies also reveal that “Dark chocolate” keeps you away from depression and elevates your mood. You are advised to check with your doctor/dietician about the portion sizes. Exceeding the recommended portion sizes may lead to spiking of blood glucose levels.

 

Eat frequently


  

American Diabetes Association suggests, eating frequent meals in intervals keeps sugar cravings in control and also helps you in losing the weight. Also eating frequently and keeps your blood glucose levels in control.

 

To read more on Diabetes, click on the link below,

https://famhealth.in/infocus-detail/diabetes

Citations www.diabetes.org Diabetes new Zealand magazine www.webmd.com