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First Aid for Fractures

First Aid for Fracture by Famhealth

Fracturehappens when one of our bones becomes cracked or broken into multiple pieces. It can result from a sports injury, accident, or violent trauma.

Fractures usually aren’t life threatening, but they do require immediate medical care.  We should learn how to recognize the symptoms of a broken bone, provide first-aid treatment, and get professional help if needed.

Symptoms:

Fractures can cause one or more of the following signs and symptoms:

  • intense pain in the injured area that gets worse when you move it
  • numbness in the injured area
  • bluish color, swelling, or visible deformity in the injured area
  • bone protruding through the skin
  • heavy bleeding at the injury site

How to provide first aid for  fractures:

If it is suspected that someone has a broken bone, provide first-aid treatment and help them get professional care:

  • Stop any bleeding: If they’re bleeding, elevate and apply pressure to the wound using a sterile bandage, a clean cloth, or a clean piece of clothing.
  • Immobilize the injured area: If you suspect they’ve broken a bone in their neck or back, help them stay as still as possible. If you suspect they’ve broken a bone in one of their limbs, immobilize the area using a splint or sling.
  • Apply cold to the area: Wrap an ice pack or bag of ice cubes in a piece of cloth and apply it to the injured area for up to 10 minutes at a time to reduce swelling and pain.
  • Treat them for shock: Help them get into a comfortable position, encourage them to rest, and reassure them. Cover them with a blanket or clothing to keep them warm.
  • Get professional help: Call ambulance or help them get to the emergency department for professional care.You can summon professional help if you notice following things:

              — You suspect they’ve broken a bone in their head, neck, or back

              –The fractured bone has pushed through their skin

              –They’re bleeding heavily .

If the person is not breathing we can start giving CPR or help them get to the emergency department by car or other means so a doctor can diagnose their condition and recommend appropriate treatment.

To read more on First Aid, click on the link below.

First Aid

Food for healthy teeth

Proteins are vital for the formation and maintenance of the tooth structure. Proteins also protect the lining of your mouth. Some of the good sources of proteins that are easily available are soy, eggs, beans, poultry, seafood and dairy products.

Calcium and phosphorus are the building blocks of teeth and a rich supply of these nutrients protect the teeth against tooth damage. Some foods which supply high amounts of calcium and phosphorous are milk and milk products, seafood, tofu, almonds, green leafy vegetables, legumes and broccoli. Cheese is exceptionally high in calcium.

Vitamin D is a vital mineral that helps in calcium absorption. Sunlight is the richest source of Vitamin D. Other readily available sources of vitamin D are milk, fish, eggs, and cod liver oil.

Potassium is an essential trace mineral that helps in blood clotting, especially when gums bleed after an injury. Some good sources of potassium are fresh fruits and vegetables. You can also find high amounts of potassium in cooked spinach, cooked broccoli, potatoes and sweet potatoes.

Did you know fluoride is a great mineral that prevents the tooth against cavities and also promotes the absorption of calcium in the body. Tap water is a source of fluoride and other sources rich in fluoride are black tea and seafood.

Does Your Daily Diet Contain These 5 Essential Micronutrients?

Essential Micronutrients by Famhealth

1. Folate  


Folate is one of the eight types of B vitamins, and it helps with the formation of red blood cells. It is water-soluble, and also called vitamin B9. The best way to get your B9 is through fruits and vegetables. Legumes like lentils and beans, spinach and asparagus are all great, folate-rich options.


2. Iron


Iron is used to create hemoglobin, which is the substance in red blood cells that carries and delivers oxygen around the body. There are two types of iron: heme, which comes from an animal source, and non-heme, which is obtained through a plant. Non-heme sources are beans, chickpeas, lentils, tofu, broccoli and spinach.


3. Magnesium


Did you know that consuming sodas, sugar and caffeine actually causes your body to lose magnesium? Good sources of magnesium are dark leafy vegetables like spinach. Nuts and seeds, such as almonds, cashews, sesame and pumpkin seeds; and whole, unrefined grains like brown rice are storehouse of magnesium.


4. Vitamin A


Essential for maintaining vision, vitamin A describes a group of fat-soluble retinoids, like retinol. Retinol is created from carotenoids, such as beta-carotene, which is often associated with foods of an orange hue such as carrots. Other sources come from animals, and can be found in foods like liver, grass-fed dairy products and egg yolks.


5. Vitamin D


The deficiency of this vitamin is linked to rising levels of depression and autoimmune disorders, laying the foundation for many chronic illnesses. Natural sources are fatty fish and fish oils, canned tuna, egg yolks, mushrooms, and tofu.