Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in posts
Search in pages

Foods rich in vital nutrients

Nuts are rich in calcium, copper, iron, phosphorus, magnesium, selenium, and zinc. Experts suggest that if you consume handful of nuts everyday its good for heart health. Since nuts are very high in calories, just having a handful of them is enough. High mineral nuts include almonds and cashews.

Beans are rich in copper, iron, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc. Beans and lentils are good sources of fiber and a good vegetarian substitute of protein. High mineral beans include white beans, soybeans, chickpeas (garbanzo), and kidney beans.

Dark Leafy Green vegetables are rich in calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. They contain minimal calories and are good for obese people. High mineral dark leafy green vegetables include spinach, and turnip greens.

Mushrooms are rich in copper, potassium, selenium, and zinc. Mushrooms are exceptionally low in calories, and you can have them with a homemade vegetable recipe or simply add it so some salad to get its maximum benefits.

Fish is rich in calcium, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and selenium. It is also rich in protein, and heart healthy omega 3 fatty acids. Fish rich in minerals include salmon, tuna, and mackerel. Fish oil is also high in omega 3 fatty acids that are good for your heart health.

Food facts on starchy food 

Minimize the intake of white bread; as it is high in calories and carbs, but low in fiber, protein and nutrients. The simple starches in bread are digested so quickly that they spike your glucose levels just like sugar — and leave you hungry soon afterward. So these foods should be avoided to prevent weight gain and other health concerns like diabetes.

Limit white rice as they are less in fiber and protein but simply are loaded with empty calories. White rice is quickly digested and absorbed, making your blood sugar rise faster. White rice should be avoided if you are diagnosed with prediabetes or if your family has a history of diabetes. If rice is your staple diet try replacing it with brown rice as they are healthier and has more nutrition benefits.

Skinless white potatoes have a very high glycemic index — meaning they raise your blood sugar quickly. So, however you like your potatoes, try to incorporate their skin. The skin’s fiber will slow your digestion and keep you full longer. (You’ll benefit from potatoes’ potassium, phosphorus, and vitamins B and C, too). Try making mashed potatoes with the skin on.

Avoid processed cereals like maida as they are starchier. The more processed a grain is the more unhealthy and calorie leaden it is. Try to consume cereals which have a bigger grain size. Just for an instance atta is more nutritious and healthier than maida. Gram flour is healthier than besan.

Pasta and chips are high in starch which is digested quickly and are low in essential nutrients. You can try for a whole wheat pasta or bean pastas. Their fiber will leave you feeling full for longer. If you want to enjoy crackers, choose whole-grain varieties. Look for brands with minimal added sugar and ingredients.

4 Superfoods You Must Add to Your Daily Diet

1. Blueberries

Blueberries are rich in fiber, antioxidants, and phytonutrients. According to a study carried out at Harvard Medical School, older adults who eat plenty of blueberries (and strawberries) are less likely to suffer from cognitive decline.

2. Apples

Apples are an excellent source of antioxidants, which combat free radicals. Researchers at Florida State found that older women who started a regime of eating apples daily experienced a 23 percent drop in levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) and a 4 percent increase in good cholesterol (HDL) after just 6 months.

3. Dark leafy vegetables

Studies have shown that a high intake of dark-leafy vegetables, such as spinach or cabbage, may significantly lower a person’s risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Spinach, for example, is very rich in antioxidants, especially when uncooked, steamed, or very lightly boiled.

4. Sweet potatoes

Sweet potatoes are rich in dietary fiber, beta-carotene (vitamin A), potassium, vitamin C, and vitamin B-6. The Center for Science in the Public Interest compared the nutritional value of sweet potatoes to other vegetables. The sweet potato ranked number one, when vitamins A and C, iron, calcium, protein, and complex carbohydrates were considered.

Healthy food in winters

Root vegetables like beets, carrots and turnips grow in plenty during winter season. Carrots are rich in beta-carotene that has exceptional health benefits to your body. Vitamin C helps can help in boosting your immunity and vitamin A is good for eye health.

Oatmeal is much more than just a convenient breakfast food; it also provides nutrients that are essential during winter. Oatmeal is high in zinc (important for proper immune function) and soluble fiber. Having an oatmeal breakfast with nuts provides you with essential nutrients and energy during winters.

Mixed vegetable or chicken soup is winter’s perfect food. But soup with minimal amount of cream and salt is more beneficial. Pair your soup with a side of 100 percent whole grain crackers. Homemade soups are the best as they are low in calories and are full of essential micronutrients that are good for health.

Cold and flu are common in winters, to prevent risk eat lots of cruciferous vegetables that boosts your defense system in winters. Broccoli and cauliflower are both high in vitamin C, which is associated with enhanced immune function. Try to buy and consume fresh broccoli and cauliflower.

Fish like salmon or tuna are good sources of vitamin D. During the winter months, when you have limited exposure to the sun, food sources containing high amounts of Vitamin D are more essential for daily intake. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with impaired growth, weakening of the bones and even the risk of heart disease. So having fish has great effects on our body during winters.

How well do you know your food?

Did you know – Vegetarian diets that include proteins from legumes, soy, low-fat dairy, nuts, seeds, whole grains and vegetables can easily meet your protein requirements.

Did you know – Whole grains are high in fiber content, low in fat, and rich in vitamin E, iron, selenium, zinc and B-complex vitamins. Eating and buying them is one of the healthiest choices you can make for yourself and your family.

Did you know – Fish is rich in Omega-fatty acids. Experts suggest that frequent consumption of fish helps protect against several chronic diseases like diabetes. Mackerel fish is both cheaper and healthier which is readily available in market for consumption.

Did you know – A balanced diet contains different types of foods (from all food groups) in such quantities and proportions that the need for all the nutrients such as carbohydrates, proteins, fats vitamins, minerals, water, and fiber are adequately met.

Easy tips for Living Healthy

Easy tips for Living Healthy by Famhealth
  • Minimize the intake of white bread; as it is high in calories and carbs, but low in fiber, protein and nutrients. The simple starches in bread are digested so quickly that they spike your glucose levels just like sugar — and leave you hungry soon afterward. So these foods should be avoided to prevent weight gain and other health concerns like diabetes.
  • Limit white rice as they are less in fiber and protein but simply are loaded with empty calories. White rice is quickly digested and absorbed, making your blood sugar rise faster. White rice should be avoided if you are diagnosed with prediabetes or if your family has a history of diabetes. If rice is your staple diet try replacing it with brown rice as they are healthier and has more nutrition benefits.
  • Skinless white potatoes have a very high glycemic index — meaning they raise your blood sugar quickly. So, however you like your potatoes, try to incorporate their skin. The skin’s fiber will slow your digestion and keep you full longer. (You’ll benefit from potatoes’ potassium, phosphorus, and vitamins B and C, too). Try making mashed potatoes with the skin on.
  • Avoid processed cereals like maida as they are starchier. The more processed a grain is the more unhealthy and calorie leaden it is. Try to consume cereals which have a bigger grain size. Just for an instance atta is more nutritious and healthier than maida. Gram flour is healthier than besan.
  • Pasta and chips are high in starch which is digested quickly and are low in essential nutrients. You can try for a whole wheat pasta or bean pastas. Their fiber will leave you feeling full for longer. If you want to enjoy crackers, choose whole-grain varieties. Look for brands with minimal added sugar and ingredients.

Does Your Daily Diet Contain These 5 Essential Micronutrients?

Essential Micronutrients by Famhealth

1. Folate  


Folate is one of the eight types of B vitamins, and it helps with the formation of red blood cells. It is water-soluble, and also called vitamin B9. The best way to get your B9 is through fruits and vegetables. Legumes like lentils and beans, spinach and asparagus are all great, folate-rich options.


2. Iron


Iron is used to create hemoglobin, which is the substance in red blood cells that carries and delivers oxygen around the body. There are two types of iron: heme, which comes from an animal source, and non-heme, which is obtained through a plant. Non-heme sources are beans, chickpeas, lentils, tofu, broccoli and spinach.


3. Magnesium


Did you know that consuming sodas, sugar and caffeine actually causes your body to lose magnesium? Good sources of magnesium are dark leafy vegetables like spinach. Nuts and seeds, such as almonds, cashews, sesame and pumpkin seeds; and whole, unrefined grains like brown rice are storehouse of magnesium.


4. Vitamin A


Essential for maintaining vision, vitamin A describes a group of fat-soluble retinoids, like retinol. Retinol is created from carotenoids, such as beta-carotene, which is often associated with foods of an orange hue such as carrots. Other sources come from animals, and can be found in foods like liver, grass-fed dairy products and egg yolks.


5. Vitamin D


The deficiency of this vitamin is linked to rising levels of depression and autoimmune disorders, laying the foundation for many chronic illnesses. Natural sources are fatty fish and fish oils, canned tuna, egg yolks, mushrooms, and tofu.

obesity

It’s Reasons and Prevention

Obesity is a disorder which results in an excessive accumulation of the
body fat. To keep a check on obesity is not only important for
cosmetic reasons, but it causes serious health issues like heart diseases
and high blood pressure. If you are obese it is most likely that
you may encounter various health problems.

 

Obesity

Obesity is a multifaceted health disorder that affects both adults and children. Being obese not only affects the overall persona of an individual but also increases the risk for many health concerns. An obese person is at a higher risk of developing health conditions like diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, breathing problems, and some cancers.

Statistics have revealed that obesity is a major factor contributing factor for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among Asian Indians. Various factors contribute towards making an individual obese. Some major factors which contribute towards obesity are environment, family history and genetics, metabolism or the way your body converts food and oxygen into energy, and individual’s lifestyle. Besides these factors certain medical conditions also leads to obesity. Scientists are also trying to understand that some chemicals in the environment may be playing in the growing obesity problem.

Recent guidelines have revealed that 10-15% of Indian population would fall under the obese category and would need appropriate management. Purpose of these guidelines on countrywide basis projects an alarming situation of T2DM and cardiovascular disease.

Some startling facts about obesity:

  • According to a recent survey conducted worldwide: India has second highest obese children in world.
  • Followed by China India ranks second in childhood obesity with the incidence of China with 15.3 million and India with 14.4 million.
  • According to National Family Health Survey in 2018 –In past one decade the number of obese people has doubled.
  • According to a latest publication in a medical journal-“The Lancet” –Currently there are 30 million obese Indians and by 2025, this number is expected to pass 70 million.
  • Did you know lack of sleep increases the chances of obesity- If you do not sleep enough you produce Ghrelin, a hormone that increases your appetite and hence adds extra pounds to your body.
  • India the third most obese country in the world – According to a study published in a medical Journal Lancet- India is just behind US and China in this global hazard list of top 10 countries with highest number of obese people.
  • Latest Survey reveals that technology addiction too is adding to obesity amongst young adults and children in India. Television, computers and video games at the cost of sports and physical activity, causing sedentary life style are prime causes of obesity among young ones.
  • Surprisingly but true-Globally, Obesity causes more deaths than malnutrition -Worldwide, obesity is one of the top five leading causes of death. It results in greater than 2.8 million deaths every year.

What is the need for new guidelines for obesity among Asian Indians?

New guidelines have been proposed in view of alarming situation of obesity among Indians. These guidelines have been prepared by 100 medical experts all across the country hailing from the backgrounds of internal medicine, diabetes, metabolism, endocrinology, nutrition, cardiology, exercise physiology, sports medicine, bariatric surgery and representing reputed medical institutions, hospitals, government funded research institutions. The very need for these guidelines has been enumerated below:

  • In view of increasing trend in frequency of obesity and related metabolic diseases, there is dire need of effective interventions in obesity
  • As Asian Indians manifest a higher risk of cardiovascular risk factors and T2DM at lower levels of obesity, the appropriate obesity diagnosis should be based on lower level of weight for height than in non-Asian Indian populations.
  • Current obesity international guidelines are not appropriate for Asian Indians. Moreover, WHO has authorized local governments and scientists to decide on the localized guidelines for the Asian Indians.
  • If appropriate diet, exercise, drug and surgery are employed at lower levels of obesity, nearly 15% of the adult population of India (nearly 5-7 crore people) will show improvement in obesity coupled with reduced risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

How obesity is diagnosed among Indians?

Three parameters which are used to measure obesity are body mass index BMI, waist circumference WC and waist-to-hip circumference ratio (WHR). The most accepted method to define thinness and fatness is BMI, a ratio of weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared (kg/m2).

What are the cut offs for BMI and WC in defining obesity among Asian Indians?

After a major consensus among scientists below table has been prepared to depict the obesity among Asian Indians:

ClassificationBMI(kg/m2)
 Principal cut-off pointsCut-off pointsfor Asians
Normal range18.5 – 24.918.5 – 22.9
23.0 – 24.9
Pre-obese25.0 – 29.925.0 – 27.4
27.5 – 29.9
Obese (Class I)30.0 – 34.930.0 – 32.4
32.5 – 34.9
Obese (Class II)35.0 – 39.935.0 – 37.4
37.5 – 39.9
Obese (class III)≥40.0≥40.0

Source:  Adapted from WHO 2004 and recent guidlines

What does recent guidelines say about WC and WHR cut offs in defining obesity?

Research has revealed that abdominal obesity is associated with higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease when compared with generalized obesity. Cardiovascular disease is associated with increased amounts of excess abdominal adipose tissue, both intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT). In view of this a joint discussion and consensus among scientists concluded the WC cut off among Asian Indians as defined below:

  • Action level 1:  Men: 78 cm, women: 72 cm. Any person with WC more than these levels should refrain from gaining weight and adopt healthy lifestyle to prevent the risk of any of the cardiovascular risk factor.
  • Action level 2: Men: 90 cm, women: 80 cm. Individuals with WC above this should seek medical help so that obesity-related risk factors could be diagnosed and handled.

What are the causes of obesity?

Obesity could be genetic, behavioral and can also result due to the hormonal changes in the body. Obesity occurs when you take in more calories than you burn through exercise and normal daily activities. Your body stores these excess calories as fat. Some medical conditions also result in obesity such as Prader-Willi syndrome, Cushing’s syndrome, and other diseases and conditions. The main reasons for obesity are either sedentary lifestyle or eating unhealthy such as junk foods at wrong intervals.

What are the risk factors that can contribute to obesity?

Obesity usually results from a combination factors, including:

  • Genetics.  Genetics may also play a role in how efficiently your body converts food into energy and how your body burns calories during exercises.
  • Family lifestyle. Family members share common eating habits. Obesity runs mostly in families as common eating habits of eating fatty foods contribute to obesity.
  • Inactivity. If you are inactive throughout the day, you are more prone towards obesity. Certain diseases like arthritis also result in decreased mobility and hence inactivity
  • Diet. A diet rich in fats and less minerals and vitamins can result in obesity
  • Medical problems. In some people, obesity can be traced to a medical conditions like  Prader-Willi syndrome, Cushing’s syndrome and other conditions. Medical problems, such as arthritis, also can lead to decreased activity, which may result in weight gain.
  • Medications. Some medicines such as antidepressants, anti-seizure medications, diabetes medications, antipsychotic medications, steroids and beta blockers also make the person obese
  • Social and economic issues. Research has shown that weight gain can be linked to social and economic factors.
  • Age. As we grow in age a decreased physical activity and lower metabolic rate can result in obesity.
  • Sleep deprivation. Not getting enough sleep or getting too much sleep can cause changes in hormones which may lead to an increase  in appetite. You may also crave foods high in calories and carbohydrates, which can contribute to weight gain.

What are the complications associated with obesity?

A number of health problems arise if you are obese. Some of the diseases which you may encounter include:

  • High triglycerides and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Cancer
  • Breathing disorders, including sleep apnea, a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Gynecological issues such as infertility and irregular periods
  • Erectile dysfunction and sexual health issues

Quality of life-If you are obese you are most likely to suffer from other issues, which can severely affect the quality of life. Some common problems which arise due to obesity include depression, disability, sexual problems, shame and guilt, social isolation, and poor performance at workplace

How can you prevent obesity?

You can take some below-mentioned steps to prevent obesity:

  • Exercise regularly. Exercises such a fast walking and swimming  for  150 to 300 minutes in a week can prevent obesity
  • Eat healthily. Eat low-calorie, nutrient-dense foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Refrain from foods which are high in fat content.
  • Monitor your weight regularly. Keep an eye on your weight at regular intervals as it can help you to assess your weight regularly

What are the recent guidelines on physical activity?

According to joint decision among scientist below is the list of guidelines about physical activity in combating obesity and associated health concerns:

  • Physical inactivity should be refrained as much as possible
  • Pro active medical consultation is recommended for those with chronic conditions or those who are symptomatic
  • Inactive people must switch on to physical activity
  • Brisk walking (walking at an intensity wherein an individual finds speaking difficult but not impossible) should be encouraged
  • On an average a total of 60 minutes of physical activity like aerobic activity, work-related activity and muscle strengthening activity should be included daily
  • For additional and greater health benefits, adults can increase their aerobic physical activity to 300 minutes (5 hours) a week of moderate-intensity, or 150 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity
  • Yoga should be included; however, more research is needed to fully explore its benefits
  • Children should undertake at least 60 min of outdoor physical activity. Screen time (television/computers) should be less than 2 hrs a day.

What is the treatment of obesity?

The treatment of obesity includes a combination treatment from a dietitian, behavior counselor or an obesity specialist. Recent guidelines suggest identifying and treating the underlying cause of obesity, lifestyle modification, pharmacological treatment like ant-obesity drugs along with lifestyle modification, and if needed surgical treatment is advisable in treating obesity.

Scientists have concluded that anti-obesity drugs should be prescribed in combination with dietary and lifestyle changes as a part of comprehensive weight loss program. Also, drug treatment should be monitored on an ongoing basis for efficacy as well as safety. In general, anti-obesity drugs should be administered for BMI above 27 kg/m2 or a BMI above 25 kg/m2

Anti-obesity drugs which are recommended to treat obesity are sibutramine, orlistat should be used as a second line therapy. At times metformin and exenatide can be used under special clinical conditions.

What is the surgical treatment for obesity?

Over the past few years bariatric surgery has come out as an option for obesity reduction. Bariatric surgery involves an alteration in the digestive system by reducing the gastric volume or by changing the path of food bolus which can lead to malabsorption. According to current international guidelines below are the guidelines for bariatric surgery:

  • Current International Guidelines: BMI above 35 kg/m2, or BMI above 40 kg/m2.
  • For Asian Indians: BMI above 32.5 kg/m2

Various surgical options are available under the umbrella of surgery which includes:

  • Restrictive Procedures like Adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) & sleeve gastrectomy
  • Combined Procedures like Roux-en-Y Gastric or Bypass (RYGBP)
  • Malabsorptive Procedures like Bilio-pancreatic diversions (BPD)
  • Experimental Procedures like ileal interposition
  • Duodeno-jejunal bypass and other implantable pulse generators.

Pros and Cons are associated with above mentioned procedures; however, it is upon the physician to decide that which surgical treatment is best suited for the particular patient.

Having a positive attitude towards weight loss and employing various changes in lifestyle such as exercising and eating a well-balanced diet can help you to lose weight. Nevertheless, obesity remains a rampant problem even in developing nation like India. Appropriate interventions are required in a timely manner to combat this problem to prevent other major health concerns.

Obesity Support Groups

These inspiring stories of those who have overcome Diabetes will keep you motivated

 

Eating Strategies for Weight Loss & Diabetes by Famhealth

7 Smart Eating Strategies To Lose Weight And Reverse Diabetes

Eating Strategies for Weight Loss & Diabetes by Famhealth. 7 Smart Eating Strategies To Lose Weight And Reverse Diabetes

1. Keep a Diary:

One of the smartest ways to begin with, is to record what you are eating throughout the day. Leading dieticians all-round the globe recommends maintaining your own small diary, to keep a check and analyse the food items you are consuming. Studies in the U.K confirm, people who maintained food records lost extra amount of weight, than people who didn’t record.

2. Watch your food labels:

Picking up a fruit juice can? Or your favourite soft drink? You’re advised to read the nutritive label. Knowing the calorie content and glycaemic index can get a little cumbersome, but research suggests, awareness of the calorie content and high sugar levels help people living with diabetes in keeping away from harmful food items which may spike their blood glucose levels.

3. Start with a good breakfast:

Research is on our side, starting the day with a good breakfast powers you with high energy and helps you maintaining your blood glucose levels throughout the day. The old saying “breakfast like a king” stands correct if you choose low carb breads & cereals, fresh juices, boiled eggs, nuts, oats, yogurt, cheese, milk and not to forget your medicines.

4. Eat by the plate method

Eating by the plate method advocated by ADA recommends, filling half of your plate with non-starchy fruits and vegetables, one fourth of your plate with lean proteins like grilled fish or chicken and the balance with low carbs. This is a popular model which not only aids in weight loss, but also keeps the blood glucose levels on check.

5. Carb counting

Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is not a diet plan, it is a meal planning strategy for people with type 1 or type-2 diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrate in the foods you eat each day.

Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks and it is very important.      Completely cutting down on carbs may lead to fatigue and restlessness. One must choose wisely and replace with diabetes friendly and healthy low carbs.

According to National Institute of Health USA, healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are vital part of a healthy eating plan because they provide both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and most importantly fibre. Fibre can help you prevent constipation, lower your cholesterol levels, and control your weight.

Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients and they often spike your blood glucose levels leading to poor diabetes management.

6. Eat more small meals

People with diabetes should eat 4-5 small meals during the day instead of three larger meals, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Eating small meals allows replenishment along with slower, continuous absorption of food, which prevents you from cravings and hunger pangs. Among the benefits are also decreased blood sugar levels after meals, reduced insulin requirements during the course of the day, weight loss and lower blood cholesterol.
 

7. Always stock up your refrigerator:

Stocking up your refrigerator with healthy food items is more or less like keeping your supplies ready. This prevents you from eating high calorie and sugary food items in times of hunger. You may choose from a wide variety of fruits, nuts, cheese, and low carb multigrain breads and protein shakes to quickly make minimeals and avoid binging.

To read more on Diabetes, click on the link below.

Diabetes Types & symptoms

Diabetes Recipe – Tropical Banana Freeze

Diabetes: Tropical banana freeze by Famhealth

Serves: 4, Time taken: 10 minutes plus 1-hour freezing

Nutrition Facts
Makes 4 Servings (Amount per Serving)
Calories (kcal)189.8
Protein (g)2.3
Carbohydrates (g)33.6
Total Sugars (g)17.4
Dietary Fibre (g)3.8
Fat (g)7.2
Saturated Fat (g)5.2

1 tbsp Grated fresh, frozen or desiccated coconut4 Bananas, peeled

1 tbsp Sesame seeds

100ml/3 fl oz Coconut milk

1 tbsp Honey

1 Lime, juice only

Steps:

  1. Slice the bananas into 2.5cm/1” pieces, lay them on a baking tray and freeze until hard (at least one hour)
  2. Dry fry the coconut and sesame seeds, stirring frequently, until browned
  3. Just before serving, take the bananas from the freezer and place in the blender with the coconut milk, honey and lime juice. Blend until smooth. Serve in small glass bowls, garnished with the toasted coconut and sesame seeds.

Note

The Glycaemic Load (GL) of banana depends on the variety of banana, where it was grown, and most importantly, how ripe it is. Choose slightly underripe bananas and the GL can be low as 11, and even the mean of 10 studies was only 12.

For more related recipes, click the link below.

Diabetes