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Foods rich in antioxidants

Kidney beans-All kinds of beans – black, pinto, red and kidney beans are high-octane sources of antioxidants. Beans are also rich in muscle-boosting protein, have no cholesterol and little fat. Combing them with grains helps in making a complete protein meal.

Raisins-If you’re looking to load up on antioxidants, have a handful of raisins. Dark raisins are packed with anthocyanins that give you an energy boost.  Sprinkle them on your breakfast oats, add them in a salad or blend some with your smoothie. 

Barley-This ancient grain is trending again and for good reason. Barley is known for its powerful antioxidant properties that make you stronger from within. Also, it has been found that when grains like barley are soaked and sprouted the antioxidant levels increase. 

Tomatoes-Juicy tomatoes are packed with three types of antioxidants – Lycopene (that gives tomato its bright red colour), Vitamin C and Vitamin A. Vitamin C is one of the most potent kinds of antioxidants that you can derive from fruits and vegetables. The lycopene in tomatoes is best absorbed when they are cooked.

Diabetes food myths and facts

Myth: People with diabetes should never have sweets! 

Truth: Good news folks! People with diabetes can have sweets occasionally. American Diabetes Association advocates that desserts and sweets are  to be relished and consumed on special occasions and festivals albeit, your blood glucose level are under control and you are taking prescribed medicines regularly.

Myth: People with diabetes cannot have juices.

Truth: People with diabetes can very much enjoy fresh juices, but they definitely need to avoid canned and packed juices because of its added sugar content and high glycaemic values.

Myth: People with diabetes cannot have fruits.

Truth: People with diabetes should offcourse have fruits keeping in mind the glycaemic indexes.  According to National Institute of health, USA fruits are a very good source of fibres and vitamin C “ascorbic acid”. All citrus fruits are rich source of vitamin C which boosts our immune system to fight against common diseases.

Myth: A big NO-NO to potatoes

Truth: People with diabetes may have potatoes (baked, grilled or steamed) in meals. Potatoes are to be ideally consumed, along with non-starchy vegetables and salads.

Myth: Diabetes diet is a very strict diet

Truth: A Diabetes diet is one of the healthiest diets, and has no hard and fast rule. Diabetes diet can be even followed by people without diabetes. You may select from a variety of options like the Mediterranean, flexitarian, vegan, Ornish to know more refer to Diet options in Famhealth.

Myth: Say no to all carbohydrates and yes to proteins

Truth: Yes carbohydrates do turn into sugars, but having overload of proteins and no carbs may lead to fatigue and cardiovascular diseases. Having more of proteins eventually leads to accumulation of fats in the body leading to cardiovascular diseases. ADA suggests, making a smart choice of having low carbohydrates will keep you energetic and prevent you from feeling low and tired.

Myth: Diabetes diet does not contain eggs, as they contribute to high cholesterol levels in the body

Truth: People with diabetes may have eggs, as eggs are a good source of protein and vitamin D. ADA says, “What really matters is the way it is cooked”. Boiled eggs with yolks removed can be consumed, to ensure that it does not aid to cardiovascular complications.

Myth: You can eat whatever you want if you are taking medications

Truth: This is one of the major myths associated with diabetes. Medications only help you to convert sugar to energy, but if you supplement your body with more than required amount of food then, it will lead to spiking of blood glucose levels and poor diabetes management.

To read more on Diabetes, click on the link below.

Diabetes Types & symptoms

Diabetes Recipe – Baked Lemon Fish With Tomatoes

Preparation :15 Minutes
Cooking :20 Minutes
Serves :4
Nutrition Facts
Makes 4 Serving (Amount per serving)
Protein (g):39
Carbohydrates (g):6
Total Sugars (g):5
Dietary Fibre (g):3
Total Fat (g):9
Saturated Fat (g):2
Sodium (mg):253

Ingredients

  • 1 onion thinly sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 720 g (6 oz) thick white fish fillets, skin and bones removed
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 lemon thinly sliced
  • 4 tomatoes cut into wedges
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 tbsp white wine
  • ½ cup (125ml) salt-reduced chicken stalk
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh parsley

Directions

  • Preheat the oven to 200 ℃
  • Spread the onion, garlic and thyme sprigs in roasting pan that will be large enough to hold all the fish fillets, with a little space in between. Place the fish on the top and season well with freshly ground black pepper
  • Arrange the lemon slices over the fish and scatter the tomatoes and bay leaves around the fish. Combine the olive oil, wine and stock and pour over the fish.
  • Bake the fish for 20 Minutes.

Note

Remember to manage your portion sizes. Recommended portion size should not exceed 2 servings/helpings. Consuming diabetes friendly recipes in inappropriate portion sizes may lead to spiking of your blood glucose levels.

For more related recipes, click o the link below.

Diabetes