5 Essential Nutrients for Healthy Growth in Children

1. Proteins

Proteins help your child in building new body cells, breaking down food into energy, fight infection, and carry oxygen. Foods that contain high levels of protein are meat, poultry, fish, eggs, nuts, beans, and dairy products.

2. Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are as essential for your child as any other food. The body use fats and proteins for building and repairing tissues. Foods that contain high levels of carbohydrates include breads, cereals, rice, pasta and potatoes.

3. Fats

Fats are a great source of energy for kids and are easily stored in a child’s body. They are also important in helping the body to properly use some of the other nutrients it needs. Foods that contain high levels of fats include whole-milk dairy products, cooking oils, meat, and fish.

4. Calcium

Calcium is essential in helping to build a child’s healthy bones and teeth. It’s also important for blood clotting and for nerve, muscle, and heart function. Foods that contain high levels of calcium include milk, cheeses, yogurt, ice cream and egg yolks.

5. Iron

Iron is necessary for a child to build healthy blood that carries oxygen to cells all over the body. Foods that contain high levels of iron include red meats, liver and poultry. Folate deficiency can cause anemia in children. Foods that contain high levels of folate include whole-grain cereals, lentils and spinach.

Foods rich in antioxidants

Kidney beans-All kinds of beans – black, pinto, red and kidney beans are high-octane sources of antioxidants. Beans are also rich in muscle-boosting protein, have no cholesterol and little fat. Combing them with grains helps in making a complete protein meal.

Raisins-If you’re looking to load up on antioxidants, have a handful of raisins. Dark raisins are packed with anthocyanins that give you an energy boost.  Sprinkle them on your breakfast oats, add them in a salad or blend some with your smoothie. 

Barley-This ancient grain is trending again and for good reason. Barley is known for its powerful antioxidant properties that make you stronger from within. Also, it has been found that when grains like barley are soaked and sprouted the antioxidant levels increase. 

Tomatoes-Juicy tomatoes are packed with three types of antioxidants – Lycopene (that gives tomato its bright red colour), Vitamin C and Vitamin A. Vitamin C is one of the most potent kinds of antioxidants that you can derive from fruits and vegetables. The lycopene in tomatoes is best absorbed when they are cooked.

Calcium Rich foods and their Role

Most cheeses are excellent sources of calcium. Parmesan cheese has the highest content of calcium among all cheese. As an added bonus, your body absorbs the calcium in dairy products more easily than that from plant sources.

Yogurt is an excellent source of calcium. Many types of yogurt are also rich in live probiotic bacteria, which have various health benefits. One cup (245 grams) of plain yogurt contains 30% of the daily-recommended dose for calcium, as well as phosphorus, potassium and vitamins B2 and B12.

Seeds are tiny nutritional powerhouses. Some are exceptionally high in calcium, including poppy, sesame, celery and chia seeds. For instance, 1 tablespoon (9 grams) of poppy seeds has 126 mg of calcium. Seeds also deliver protein and healthy fats. For example, chia seeds are rich in plant-based omega-3 fatty acids.

Milk and milk products are good sources of calcium. Daily consumption of milk helps in keeping our bones and teeth strong. Low – fat milk is a good option as it not only prevents the overloading of extra calories but also supplements your body with required calcium.

Tofu is an excellent source of calcium. You can simply add it to the vegetables or can stir-fry and eat. One block of tofu contains 1624 mg of calcium. Figs are also rich in calcium.

Does Your Daily Diet Contain These 5 Essential Micronutrients?

Essential Micronutrients by Famhealth

1. Folate  


Folate is one of the eight types of B vitamins, and it helps with the formation of red blood cells. It is water-soluble, and also called vitamin B9. The best way to get your B9 is through fruits and vegetables. Legumes like lentils and beans, spinach and asparagus are all great, folate-rich options.


2. Iron


Iron is used to create hemoglobin, which is the substance in red blood cells that carries and delivers oxygen around the body. There are two types of iron: heme, which comes from an animal source, and non-heme, which is obtained through a plant. Non-heme sources are beans, chickpeas, lentils, tofu, broccoli and spinach.


3. Magnesium


Did you know that consuming sodas, sugar and caffeine actually causes your body to lose magnesium? Good sources of magnesium are dark leafy vegetables like spinach. Nuts and seeds, such as almonds, cashews, sesame and pumpkin seeds; and whole, unrefined grains like brown rice are storehouse of magnesium.


4. Vitamin A


Essential for maintaining vision, vitamin A describes a group of fat-soluble retinoids, like retinol. Retinol is created from carotenoids, such as beta-carotene, which is often associated with foods of an orange hue such as carrots. Other sources come from animals, and can be found in foods like liver, grass-fed dairy products and egg yolks.


5. Vitamin D


The deficiency of this vitamin is linked to rising levels of depression and autoimmune disorders, laying the foundation for many chronic illnesses. Natural sources are fatty fish and fish oils, canned tuna, egg yolks, mushrooms, and tofu.

The Fourth Month of Pregnancy

4 months pregnancy

Physical Changes

  1. Moles and freckles may become darker with the increase in skin pigmentation. There is pigmentation around the nipples
  2. A dark line may appear down the centre of the stomach
  3. An increased appetite results in clothes getting tight
  4. The waistline starts to expand
  5. The baby bump begins to show as a gentle rounding of the stomach
  6. The breasts may still be of normal size but they will grow in the coming weeks.

Features of the Baby

  • Length: 6 inches
  • Weight :  135 gms
  • This is a period of rapid growth for the baby.
  • Fine hair appears on the body and face
  • The skin is transparent showing the blood vessels underneath
  • Joints have formed and hard bones are developing
  • Sex organs are mature enough to disclose the sex
  • Baby sucks the thumb
  • Baby’s heart beats twice as fast as the mother
  • Baby moves around vigorously though the mother still cannot feel it
  • The baby has a neck of its own
  • The baby’s fingers have their own finger print pattern
  • The head is still large for the body.

Suggestions

  • Both the partners must give up smoking if not done already.
  • As the appetite is growing the mother needs to be more careful of what she is eating and avoid unhealthy food. It pays to be sensible and watch the weight.
  • It is a good idea to check with the doctor who may recommend iron supplements around this time. Iron supplements should be taken on a full stomach and preferably with a good source of vitamin c to increase their bioavailability.
  • Normally after the first trimester the folic acid supplements are stopped.
  • It is time to make a second visit to the antenatal clinic where there would be an ultrasound scan; a serum screening test and amniocentesis if there are any chances of the baby having any abnormality.

Question of the day

How can you be sure that the baby is normal?

The chance of the baby being abnormal is very slim as most abnormalities occur in the initial weeks and end in a miscarriage. By now the baby is fully formed and if the parents ensure a good lifestyle, which provides a safe environment for the baby, the risks can be reduced further.

To read more on Pregnancy, click on the link below,

Pregnancy

HAIR CARE

Hair Problems And Precautions

Hair is made up of protein. Each hair strand consists of two parts. The root of the hair is the living part
inside the skin and the shaft is the hair we see on our scalp is the non-living part of the hair. Hair care
needs to focus on nourishing the root and the scalp and also maintain the integrity of the hair shaft.

Hair Care

Hair Care by Famhealth

Some of the common hair problems include:

  • Split Ends
  • Dandruff
  • Hair loss
  • Lack of volume
  • Oily hair
  • Scalp which is scalpy
  • Frizzy, dull, dry and brittle hair
  • Sun damage to hair
  • Chlorine damage to hair
  • Hair loss

What are the factors that affect health of our hair?

  • Diet- The best way to nourish the hair root is by having a healthy diet, rich in nutrients like iron and proteins, as these are vital for nourishing the hair root. Pulses, meat, eggs, nuts and green leafy vegetables are all good sources of these nutrients.
  • Keeping the hair covered while outdoors and the use of a good conditioner can help in keeping the hair shaft shiny and smooth.
  • Oiling the hair at regular intervals can help in improving the blood circulation of the scalp and aid in better hair growth.
  • Deep conditioning treatments and hair masks can help in imparting moisture to the hair shaft.
  •  People with oily scalps can benefit from the use of a dry shampoo to keep their scalp fresh for longer as frequent shampooing can damage the hair cuticle.
  • Trimming every 6 to 8 weeks helps in removing the brittle split ends and also keeps your hair style looking fresh and updated.

What precautions can help in keeping hair healthy?

  • Air conditioning and sun exposure makes the cuticle dry and brittle and this makes the hair look dull and also causes splitting and breaking of hair.
  • The scalp is prone to certain conditions like dandruff, boils and lice infestation. It is important to check your scalp regularly and get these conditions treated as they can otherwise lead to hair loss due to breaking.
  • It’s also best not to share towels and combs with anyone, as sometimes that can cause diseases like fungal infections scabies to spread.
  • Washing the hair regularly is of vital importance for good hair health. These days, using a sulfate and paraben free shampoo is recommended, as these chemicals damage the hair.
  • It is also important to check the ph of your shampoo as an acidic ph of between 5-6.5 is ideal for the hair. Washing the hair very often can strip the scalp and the hair shaft of their natural oils, so wash your hair only when it’s really needed.
  • After shampooing, it’s always a good idea to use a conditioner on the ends of the hair as these are prone to split ends.
  • Always wash off the conditioner with cold water, this keeps the cuticle shiny.
  • Avoid combing your hair when it’s wet as this is when it’s most prone to breaking.

Beautiful hair is an asset and with the right care it can always be your crowning glory.

Sources

https://emedicine.medscape.com

https://www.aad.org/public

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