Snake Bite

First Aid: Snake Bite by Famhealth

A snake bite is an injury caused by the bite of a snake, especially a venomous snake.

Symptoms

  • Visual of 2 puncture wounds
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Severe pain at the area
  • Vomiting
  • Trouble seeing
  • Tingling of the limbs

Treatment

  • Washing the wound with soap and water
  • Antivenom

Prevention

  • Protective footwear
  • Avoiding areas where snakes live
  • Not handling snakes

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First Aid

Bee Stings/ Insect Bite

Bee Stings/ Insect Bite by Famhealth

Not all bites or stings are the same. You will need different first aid treatment and medical care depending on what type of creature has bitten or stung you. Some species can cause more damage than others. Some people also have allergies that raise the risk of a serious reaction. Here’s how to recognize and treat the symptoms of bites and stings from insects, spiders, and snakes.

Common Symptoms

The common symptoms are redness, swelling of face, lips or throat, pain, itching, hives, abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting, breathing problems and shock.

First aid treatment

If someone shows signs of a severe allergic reaction, help them get emergency medical attention and follow the steps in the next section. If they show no signs of a severe reaction, treat the site of the bite or sting for minor symptoms:

Step 1:

If the insect’s stinger is still embedded in their skin, remove it by gently scraping a flat-edged object, such as a credit card, across their skin. Avoid using tweezers to remove the stinger, since squeezing it may release more venom.

Step 2:

Wash the area of the bite with soap and water.

Step 3:

Place a cold compress or ice pack on the area for about 10 minutes at a time to help reduce pain and swelling. Wrap any ice or ice packs in a clean cloth to protect their skin.

Step 4:

Apply calamine lotion or a paste of baking soda and water to the area several times a day to help relieve itching and pain. Calamine lotion is a type of antihistamine cream.

Emergency treatment for a severe allergic reaction

If you suspect someone may be having a severe allergic reaction:

  • Ask someone else to call emergency services, right away. If you’re alone, contact emergency services before you provide other treatment.
  • Ask the person whether they carry an epinephrine auto-injector. If they do, retrieve it for them and help them use it according to the label directions.
  • Encourage them to remain calm, lie down quietly with their legs elevated, and stay still. If they start to vomit, turn them onto their side to allow the vomit to drain and prevent choking.
  • If they become unconscious and stop breathing, begin CPR. Continue it until medical help arrives.

To avoid making matters worse, don’t apply a tourniquet. You should also avoid giving them anything to eat or drink.

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First Aid

Heart Attack

First Aid: Heart Attack by Famhealth

A heart attack is a medical emergency. Call 108 or your local emergency number if you think you or someone else is having a heart attack.

The average person waits 3 hours before seeking help for symptoms of a heart attack. Many heart attack patients die before they reach a hospital. The sooner the person gets to the emergency room, the better the chance of survival. Prompt medical treatment reduces the amount of heart damage.

Causes

A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle becomes starved for oxygen and begins to die.

Symptoms

Symptoms of a heart attack can vary from person to person. They may be mild or severe.

Symptoms in adults may include:

  • Changes in mental status, especially in older adults.
  • Chest pain that feels like pressure, squeezing, or fullness. The pain is most often in the centre of the chest. It can last for more than a few minutes, or come and go.
  • Cold sweat.
  • Light headedness.
  • Nausea
  • Numbness, aching, or tingling in the arm (usually the left arm, but the right arm may be affected alone, or along with the left).
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Weakness or fatigue.

First Aid

If you think someone is having a heart attack:

  • Have the person sit down, rest, and try to keep calm.
  • Loosen any tight clothing.
  • Ask if the person takes any chest pain medicine such as nitroglycerin for a known heart condition help them take it.
  • If the pain does not go away promptly with rest or within 3 minutes of taking nitroglycerin, call for emergency medical help.
  • If the person is unconscious and unresponsive, call 108 (or your local emergency number) and  begin CPR.
  • Continue CPR till the person recover or you get a medical support

How to do CPR?

  • Check the response
  • Check the carotid pulse for less than 10 second.
  • If in case of feeble pulse or no pulse start CPR. Perform 30 compression and 2 breathing and continue the cycle

Do Not:

  • Do NOT leave the person alone except to call for help if necessary.
  • Do NOT allow the person to deny the symptoms and convince you not to call for emergency help.
  • Do NOT wait to see if the symptoms go away.
  • Do NOT give the person anything by mouth unless a heart medicine (such as nitroglycerin) has been prescribed.

Prevention

Adults should take steps to control heart disease risk factors whenever possible.

  • If you smoke, quit. Smoking more than doubles the chance of developing heart disease.
  • Keep blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes in good control and follow your health care provider’s orders.
  • Lose weight if obese or overweight.
  • Get regular exercise to improve heart health.
  • Eat a heart-healthy diet.
  • Limit the amount of alcohol you drink. One drink a day is associated with reducing the rate of heart attacks.

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First Aid

When Somebody Faints in the Office

When Somebody Faints in the Office by Famhealth

Fainting occurs when your brain temporarily doesn’t receive enough blood supply, causing you to lose consciousness. This loss of consciousness is usually brief.

If you feel faint

  • Lie down or sit down:-To reduce the chance of fainting again, don’t get up too quickly.
  • Place your head between your knees if you sit down.

If someone else faints

  • Position the person on his or her back. If there are no injuries and the person is breathing, raise the person’s legs above heart level — about 12 inches (30 centimeters) — if possible. Loosen belts, collars or other constrictive clothing.
  • To reduce the chance of fainting again, don’t get the person up too quickly. If the person doesn’t regain consciousness within one minute, call 108 or your local emergency number.
  • Check for pulse.  Check for carotid pulse in neck for less than 10 second and at the same time watch for chest movements for breathing   .In case of feeble pulse or no pulse   , begin CPR. Call 108 or your local emergency number. Continue CPR until help arrives or the person begins to breathe.
  • If the person was injured in a fall associated with a faint, treat bumps, bruises or cuts appropriately. Control bleeding with direct pressure.
  • If Pulse is there check the blood glucose with a glucometer. If sugar is less immediately give sugar with water to drink (anything sugary is fine)

**** ONLY FOR AN CONSCIOUS PERSON ,IF UNCONSCIOUS TAKE THE VICTIM TO HOSPITAL.

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First Aid

Dealing with Stroke

First Aid: What to do with a patient who has a Stroke by Famhealth

The sudden death of brain cells due to lack of oxygen, caused by blockage of blood flow or rupture of an artery to the brain. Sudden loss of speech, weakness, or paralysis of one side of the body can be symptoms.

Stroke may cause loss of balance or unconsciousness, which may result in a fall. If you think you or someone around you may be having a stroke.

How to recognize stroke.

The most commonly used technique to identify the sign of stroke is FAST.

  • Face:Is the face numb or does it droop on one side?
  • Arms:Is one arm numb or weaker than the other? Does one arm stay lower than the other when trying to raise both arms?
  • Speech: Is speech slurred or garbled?
  • Time:If you answered yes to any of the above, call emergency services immediately.

First aid for Stroke.

  • Call emergency services. If you’re having stroke symptoms, have someone else call for you. Stay as calm as possible while waiting for emergency help.
  • If you’re caring for someone else having a stroke, make sure they’re in a safe, comfortable position. Preferably, this should be lying on one side with their head slightly raised and supported in case they vomit.
  • Check to see if they’re breathing. If they’re not breathing at all, perform CPR. If they’re having difficulty breathing, loosen any constrictive clothing, such as a tie or scarf.
  • Talk in a calm, reassuring manner.
  • Cover them with a blanket to keep them warm.
  • Do not give them anything to eat or drink.
  • If the person is showing any weakness in a limb, avoid moving them.
  • Observe the person carefully for any change in condition, and be prepared to tell the emergency operator about their symptoms and when they started. Be sure to mention if the person fell or hit their head.

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First Aid

First Aid for Drowning

First Aid for Drowning by Famhealth

Get Help

  • Notify a lifeguard, if one is close. If not, ask someone to call 102 ,108.
  • If you are alone, follow the steps below.

Move the Person

  • Take the person out of the water.

Check for Breathing

  • Place your ear next to the person’s mouth and nose. Do you feel air on your cheek?
  • Look to see if the person’s chest is moving.

If the Person is Not Breathing, Check Pulse

  • Check the person’s pulse for 10 seconds.

If There is No Pulse, Start CPR

  • Carefully place person on back.
  • For an adult or child, place the heel of one hand on the center of the chest at the nipple line. You can also push with one hand on top of the other. For an infant, place two fingers on the breastbone.
  • For an adult or child, press down at least 2 inches. Make sure not to press on ribs. For an infant, press down about 1 and 1/2 inches. Make sure not to press on the end of the breastbone.
  • Do chest compressions only, at the rate of 100-120 per minute or more. Let the chest rise completely between pushes.
  • Check to see if the person has started breathing.

Repeat if Person Is Still Not Breathing

  • If you’ve been trained in CPR, you can now open the airway by tilting the head back and lifting the chin.
  • Pinch the nose of the victim closed. Take a normal breath, cover the victim’s mouth with yours to create an airtight seal, and then give 2 one-second breaths as you watch for the chest to rise.
  • Give 2 breaths followed by 30 chest compressions.

Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation for a drowning victim :

  • Turn the drowning person’s head to the side, allowing any water to drain from his or her mouth and nose. Turn the head back to the center.
  • Begin mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on land, if possible, or in the water if the injured person needs immediate life-and-death measures.
  • Strongly breathe four times into the mouth of the injured person as you pinch his or her nose. This helps air get past any water that is clogging the breathing passageways and the lungs.
  • After four strong breaths, put your ear near the mouth and watch the chest for any breathing movement.
  1. Check the pulse for signs of life.
  2. Repeat the cycle.

***You’re not out of the water once the drowning victim starts to breathe and choke. In fact, the first 48 hours after a drowning incident can be the most dangerous. Complications resulting from water exposure—pneumonia, infection, heart failure—can all occur during this time. Therefore, you should always take a drowning victim to the hospital.

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https://famhealth.in/infocus-detail/first-aid


Medical Emergency Contacts

Medical Emergency Contacts by Famhealth
Emergency contactsPh. Nos.
POLICE (Medico legal case)100
FIRE101
AMBULANCE102
Disaster Management Services108
Women Helpline1091
Air Ambulance9540161344 
AIDS Helpline1097
Senior Citizen Helpline1091 , 1291 
Medical Helpline in Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Uttarakhand, Goa, Tamil Nadu, Rajasthan, Karnataka, Assam, Meghalaya, M.P And U.P108
Railway Accident Emergency Service1072
Road Accident Emergency Service1073
Road Accident Emergency Service On National Highway For Private Operators1033
Relief Commissioner For Natural Calamities1070

During an emergency, it is all too easy to become overwhelmed, or even confused and disoriented. With a little bit of preparation, you can ensure you go through any emergencies (or even minor scares) in the best way possible.

One of the best ways is to have all the information you might need during an emergency ready at hand.

Below you can find printable sheets with important emergency phone numbers and information customized to your area.

  • Print the emergency numbers and post them on the fridge and next to every phone in the house. Carry a copy with you, and have one in your car.
  • Fill out the extra information clearly, in large print using a dark pen. It should be easy to read by kids, or during emergencies when the lights may be very low.
  • Review the page every few months to make sure all the details are still up-to-date.
  • If you have a home alarm, make sure you and others in the home know how to use it to activate local emergency services (ambulance, police, fire station)


How to Remove Water from your Ear

How to Remove Water from your Ear by Famhealth

If water does get trapped in your ear, you can try several at-home remedies for relief:

Jiggle your earlobe

This first method may shake the water out of your ear right away. Gently tug or jiggle your earlobe while tilting your head in a downward motion toward your shoulder. You can also try shaking your head from side to side while in this position.

Make gravity do the work

With this technique, gravity should help the water drain from your ear.Lie on your side for a few minutes, with your head on a towel to absorb the water. The water may slowly drain out of your ear.

Create a vacuum

This method will create a vacuum that may draw the water out.

  • Tilt your head sideways, and rest your ear onto your cupped palm, creating a tight seal.
  • Gently push your hand back and forth toward your ear in a rapid motion, flattening it as you push and cupping it as you pull away.
  • Tilt your head down to allow the water to drain.

Apply a hot compress

  • Using hot but not scalding water, wet a washcloth. Make sure to wring out the washcloth before using it so that it doesn’t drip.
  • Tilt head downward on the affected side and apply the cloth to the outside of the ear. Leave it on the ear for about 30 seconds, and then remove it for a minute.
  • Repeat these steps four or five times. It may help to sit up or lie down on the side opposite of the affected side of your body afterward.

Use a blow dryer

The heat from the dryer can help evaporate the water inside the ear canal.

  • Set the blow dryer to its lowest setting.
  • Hold the hair dryer about a foot away from the ear and move it in a back-and-forth motion.
  • While tugging down on the earlobe, let the warm air blow into the ear.

Try alcohol and vinegar eardrops

The alcohol can help evaporate the water in your ear. Alcohol also works to eliminate the growth of bacteria, which can help prevent infection. If the trapped water occurs due to earwax buildup, the vinegar may help remove it.

  • Combine equal parts alcohol and vinegar to make eardrops.
  • Using a sterile dropper, apply three or four drops of this mixture into the ear.
  • Gently rub the outside of the ear.
  • Wait 30 seconds, and tilt the head sideways to let the solution drain out.

Use hydrogen peroxide eardrops

Hydrogen peroxide can help clear debris, earwax, bacteria, or trapped water from your ear.

  • Using a clean dropper, place three to four drops of hydrogen peroxide into your ear.
  • Wait two to three minutes.
  • Tilt the affected side downward, allowing the fluid to drain out.

Don’t use this method if you think you have any of these conditions:

  • an outer ear infection, perforated eardrum and eardrum tubes.

Try olive oil

Olive oil can also help prevent ear infection, as well as repel water out.

  • Warm some olive oil in a small bowl.
  • Using a clean dropper, place a few drops of the oil into the affected ear.
  • Lie on the  other side for about 10 minutes, and then sit up and tilt the ear downward. The water and oil should drain out.

Yawn or chew

When water gets stuck, moving your mouth can sometimes help to open the tubes. Yawn or chew gum to relieve tension in your Eustachian tubes.

Perform the Valsalva maneuver

This method can also help open closed eustachian tubes. Be careful not to blow too hard. This can damage your ear drum.

  • Close your mouth and gently squeeze your nostrils shut with your fingers.
  • Breathe deeply, and slowly blow the air out of the nose. If popping sound noticed,  it means the Eustachian tubes have opened.
  • Tilt your head to allow the water to drain from your ear.

Use steam

Warm steam can help release water from your middle ear through your eustachian tubes. Try taking a hot shower, or giving yourself a mini sauna with a bowl of hot water.

  • Fill a large bowl with hot steaming water.
  • Cover your head with a towel to keep the steam in, and hold your face over the bowl.
  • Inhale the steam for 5 or 10 minutes, and then tilt your head to the side to drain your ear.
  • 12. Try more water

This technique may sound illogical, but it can actually help draw water out of your ear.

  • Lying on your side, fill the affected ear with water using a clean dropper.
  • Wait five seconds and then turn over, with the affected ear facing down. All of the water should drain out.

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First Aid

Handling Minor Burns

First Aid: Handling Minor Burns by Famhealth
  • Gently clean the wound with lukewarm water.
  • Though butter has been used as a home remedy, it should NOT be used on any burn.
  • Rings, bracelets, and other potentially constricting articles should be removed (edema, or swelling from inflammation may occur and the item may cut into the skin).
  • The burn may be dressed with a topical antibiotic ointment like Bacitracin or Neosporin. Silvadene (silver sulfadiazine) topical is the preferred agent for most burns, and is available over the counter in many locations.
  • If there is concern that the burn is deeper and may be second or third degree in nature, medical care should be accessed.
  • Tetanus immunization should be updated if needed.

For electrical burns:

Victims of electrical burns should always seek medical care.

For chemical burns:

  • Identify the chemical that was involved.
  • Contact the Poison Control Center in your area or your local hospital’s Emergency Department. You will be automatically linked to the nearest poison control center. Many chemical burns may be treated with local wound care. Some chemicals can cause life- and limb-threatening injuries and need emergent intervention. It is recommended that the hotline phone number be stored on your cell phone as well as posted at home and at the workplace.
  • Victims with chemical burns to their eyes should always seek emergency care.

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First Aid

Nose Bleed

First Aid: Handling a Nose Bleed by Famhealth

A NOSE BLEED is bleeding from the nose that commonly occurs when tiny blood vessels inside the nose are ruptured.

Treatment of Nose Bleed: 

To control the blood loss and to maintain an open airway

Procedure:

Sit up straight and tip your head slightly forward.

Note: Do not tilt your head back. This may cause blood to run down the back of your throat, and you may swallow it. Swallowed blood can irritate your stomach and cause vomiting. And vomiting may make the bleeding worse or cause it to start again. Spit out any blood that gathers in your mouth and throat rather than swallowing it.

Use your thumb and forefinger to firmly pinch the soft part of your nose shut. The nose consists of a hard, bony part and a softer part made of cartilage. Nose bleeds usually occur in the soft part of the nose. Spraying the nose with a medicated nasal spray (such as Afrin) before applying pressure may help stop a nosebleed. You will have to breathe through your mouth.

Apply an ice pack to your nose and cheeks. Cold will constrict the blood vessels and help stop the bleeding.

Keep pinching for a full 10 minutes. Use a clock to time the 10 minutes. It can seem like a long time. Resist the urge to peek after a few minutes to see if your nose has stopped bleeding.

Check to see if your nose is still bleeding after 10 minutes. If it is, hold it for 10 more minutes. Most nosebleeds will stop after 10 to 20 minutes of direct pressure.

Put a thin layer of a saline- or water-based nasal gel, such as NasoGel, or an antiseptic nasal cream inside your nose. Do not blow your nose or put anything else inside your nose for at least 12 hours after the bleeding has stopped.

Rest quietly for a few hours.

Conclusion:

 Proper management of nose bleed should  be applied to prevent prolonged bleeding

If the bleeding is severe or lasts longer than 30 minutes ,send the casuality to the hospital immediately.

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First Aid