diabetes

Its Symptoms And Solutions

Approximately 70 million people suffer from Diabetes in India. As our doctors say, diabetes is not just a
condition but a lifestyle.Learn about diabetes, its symptoms and how best to manage your lifestyle
when you have diabetes.

 

Understanding Diabetes

Diabetes is an endocrine disorder that elevates your blood sugar levels over a prolonged period of time. It is caused by the malfunctioning of the pancreatic cells, which produce insufficient or no Insulin. It is a chronic disorder which can be managed with right medication and healthy lifestyle.

 

Deeper Dive

Managing diabetes can feel overwhelming at times. However, understanding the deeper aspects can
burst many myths and shows diabetes can be managed easily. Let’s venture out different diabetes
issues and better ways to deal them.

 

Managing Diabetes

Lifestyle changes include adopting a healthy diet and exercise plan which plays a direct role in
controlling the blood glucose levels of a person living with diabetes. It is important to deal with the stress
and emotional turmoil that comes with this diagnosis and so getting the right support and
making lifestyle changes to successfully manage this condition is imperative.

 

Diabetes And Your Personality

A research conducted on 3500 patients by a school in Westminster, USA concluded that there are two major personality characteristics in the management of diabetes are the Interactive and the
Independent personality.

 

Happy Living

A healthy diabetes diet aids in treating and controlling blood sugar level. Though everyone requires a
balanced diet to stay healthy, diabetics need to watch out the food they eat to keep an eye on spiked
blood sugar levels. Here are some healthy eating strategies which can curb diabetes.

 

Diabetes Friendly Recipes

An assortment of some yummy diabetic-friendly recipes are not bring down blood sugar levels, but are
a delight to eat. Here we bring you easy and quick recipe tricks and tips, which are easy and quick to cook.

 

Related Videos On TV

 

Diabetes Support Groups

These inspiring stories of those who have overcome Diabetes will keep you motivated

 

Just Detected

Just Detected with Diabetes

Being diagnosed with diabetes can be an overwhelming experience In fact, it can be a major life stress for many people. This is especially true as most chronic conditions and progressive diseases can prove to be quite challenging to manage emotionally.

If you or your family are feeling anxious and disheartened, you should know that it is natural to feel that way. You should also know that you are not alone, and that 70 million other people in India are living with Diabetes. This is a condition that needs to be “managed”.

In brief, Diabetes is characterized by high blood glucose levels that result from defects in the body’s ability to produce enough insulin, and at times no insulin is produced at all. Insulin is required to remove sugars and toxins from our system, and when they do not get flushed out, they tend to accumulate, resulting in high blood glucose levels.

You will be happy to know there are countless cases of people who have reversed their condition simply by making changes in their daily lives, especially when it comes to food, exercise and stress management. With some precautions and care, we are confident that you too can be a winner.

Remember, with a clear plan, appropriate guidance, right (and on time) medications, timely tests and appropriate modifications to your lifestyle you can not only overcome your condition but stay on top of it. To know more, please refer to our Let’s Understand section

Remember, we are here to help you in your endeavour to stay focussed and on target!

Some quick tips that the American Diabetes Association and other bodies recommend that you should follow:

  • Find a good doctor
    • We recommend seeking the advice of a specialist, in this case an ‘endocrinologist’ or ‘diabetologist’ who can help and direct you with a constructive plan of action. Check with your doctor if you have to repeat your tests.
  • Acquire as much information as you can
    • An informed person can make better decisions. Therefore, it is essential for you to get to know more about food and other lifestyle changes that will help you manage better. Newly-diagnosed people are frequently advised to control blood sugar levels by following a healthy nutrition plan along with a regular exercise regime. To know more, read recommended diets and exercise plans for people living with diabetes.
  • Seek help and support from your family
    • Research suggests that with family support one can manage diabetes much more effectively than running self-managed programmes. Your partner, family, and friends play a huge role in motivating you and helping you adhere to your diabetes management programme.
  • Make your own plan:
    • As you may already know, food plays a very important role in diabetes management. An ideal diabetes meal plan consists of low carbs, low sugar, lean proteins and high fibre diet. You may choose from a wide variety of Diabetes meal plans available to you. Before you start following one, you are advised to check with your doctor or dietician regarding the amount of calories you need to take in a day/week, according to your BMI and physical activity rate.
      You may also seek a dietician’s advice to put together a plan that works best for you
  • Check on Alcohol and tobacco consumption
    • Research suggests smoking may aggravate complications from Diabetes, such as heart diseases and may lead to nerve and kidney damage. It is, therefore, highly advisable to significantly limit or give up smoking. 
      Alcohol consumption can have a strong impact on your blood sugar levels, not to mention liver-related disorders. It is a good idea to take your doctor’s advice on whether you can consume alcohol, and how much. In any case, please remember to always eat a meal while consuming alcohol to prevent fluctuations or spiking of blood glucose levels.
  • Medicines – on time, every time!
    • One of the most crucial aspects of Diabetes management is to take your medication regularly and avoiding skipping meals. The medical explanation is that medicines and food have a direct role in keeping “good control” of blood glucose levels.
      If your doctor has advised you to take Insulin then please DO NOT skip your shots. Many people fear pain or scarring resulting from the Insulin shots, and the good news is that one can learn the right, less painful ways of taking Insulin. Refer to our “Insulin section” for more details.
      In fact, in order to keep your blood glucose levels in control, you should eat small meals more frequently and consult a dietician to plan the best possible meal plan for you.
  • Indulge yourself. Take extra care of your teeth to keep gum diseases at bay
    • While it is true that you have to follow a strict plan, talk to your doctor about rewarding yourself once in a while. 
      However, do keep in mind the fact that you have to keep up with your basic health and hygiene requirements. Do brush your teeth at least twice a day, as people living with Diabetes tend to have frequently-returning gum infections. You should also floss your teeth once a week and see a dentist at least twice a year. Inform your dentist if your gums bleed or get swollen to have the concerns addressed at the earliest.
  • Be careful about Wounds
    • Take your wounds seriously, do go and see a doctor immediately if you feel your wounds are healing slowly, or not healing at all as high blood sugar can reduce blood flow, damage nerves and delay healing. It is essential to take care of your foot as minor cuts and blisters can lead to serious infections. Infact people living with Diabetes should also monitor for tingling or loss of sensation in the hands and feet.
  • Last but not the least
    • With a strong determination and sincere effort, one can easily control Diabetes and enjoy living life like never before. 
      Join the support community for family and friends of people living with Diabetes, a unique platform to share, help and bring a change in the lives of families and people living with Diabetes.

What can I do as a family/friend of a newly diagnosed loved one ?

As a partner or caregiver, it is understandable that your feel anxious and concerned on hearing the diagnosis of Diabetes.

Please be assured that there is no cause for concern as this is a condition that can be managed with a little care and diligence. You may need to play a pivotal role in the management of the condition for your partner or a loved one and therefore, you would need to be supporting and considerate. Research points to high success rates for diabetics that have had the support of a spouse or family member.

  • No need to panic
    • While Diabetes is considered a lifelong “chronic” condition, there is no need to panic as it can be managed with lifestyle and diet changes. Please be caring and supportive as your partner/family member may have to depend on you to make the required changes and live a long and healthy life
  • Participate
    • It is a good idea to actively participate in your partner’s plans and health goals. By working as a team your support is implicit. Set reminders to take medication on time, learn how to inject insulin, figure out what food items work and what don’t. Set realistic goals, and learn the fine art of encouraging without nagging.
  • De-stress yourself
    • Diabetes can impact the whole family and not just the person living with the condition. In order to avoid the caregiver fatigue syndrome, it is a good idea to spend some time for you. Take timeout to pursue your own goals and keep up with your friends and associates outside of the Diabetic circle.

To read more on Diabetes, click on the link below.

Diabetes

I Need Insulin

I need insulin by Famhealth

My doctor is insisting on Insulin, what do I need to know ?

Insulin is produced in our body naturally by the pancreatic cells and helps the body in converting sugar into energy. When our body produces insufficient or no insulin then doctors recommend taking Insulin additionally, to ensure body metabolises carbohydrates into sugar, and sugar does not accumulate for a prolonged period of time in the form of blood glucose.

There are myths associated with taking Insulin, read below to find out the most frequently asked questions by people living with diabetes.

I have been asked by my doctor to take Insulin, is my Diabetes getting worse ?

Taking Insulin does not necessarily mean that your Diabetes is getting worse. To control your high blood glucose levels your doctor may prescribe Insulin therapy. By not taking the Insulin therapy you may further develop Diabetes-related complications such as Glaucoma in the eyes and malfunctioning of the kidneys or the liver, neuropathy, foot problems, nerve related issues etc. People with Type 2 Diabetes often use combined therapy of medicine and Insulin to keep their sugar levels in control.

Will injecting Insulin be painful ?

Injecting Insulin is not as painful as you may think. Your doctor will direct you how to inject Insulin in the right way and painlessly. Insulin should be given in the areas where one has more flab and less muscle. There are many new types of syringes which are thinner and painless to use, so this should not be a cause for worry.

Once I begin Insulin, will I have to take it for the rest of my life ?

The answer to this question is different for different types of Diabetes. For people living with Type 1 Diabetes this is true; however, for people with Type 2 Diabetes, studies have shown that taking medication on time, physical exercises and diet control can lead to reversal of the condition. Some people simply do not want to start Insulin because of the fear of having to take it forever. However studies have revealed that once the blood glucose levels are under control, patients have been able to switch back to oral medication and no longer have to depend on Insulin.

Travelling with Insulin is tedious, can I miss my injections ?

Doctors all round the world strongly recommend that people who are Insulin dependent must not miss any injections. If you miss your regular dose, it will disrupt the ground you have gained in Diabetes management and take you back to square one. Your blood sugar levels will shoot up and create an imbalance of toxins in the body, leading to further complications.

It is a good idea to make your own small back-pack where you could keep your syringes, Insulin, cotton, gauze and astringent handy. Insulin has to be kept in a cool place and, hence, sometimes needs to be refrigerated. If you are travelling, check with your pharmacist for new types of Insulin pens and cartridges, which might not need refrigeration.

What I can do as family/friend of a person living on Insulin ?

If your partner has Insulin-dependent Diabetes, we understand that you would have your own set of stresses that can be mentally and physically exhausting. You would need to be able to support your partner in different ways, such as establishing and maintaining a healthy diet and exercise routine, checking your partner for wounds that may be concerning, learning to give Insulin shots correctly and painlessly, as well as routinely check blood glucose levels.

There are quite a few things that you can do to help yourself and your partner. First and foremost, in order to support your partner in living with this condition, you need to take care of yourself, both mentally and physically. Establish a health plan for yourself, which will keep you in good shape to deal with the stresses that go along with Diabetes. It is even better if you can exercise together. Taking up meditation and yoga is also a very good way to reduce the impact of stress on your body.

You do not need to give up your life and pleasures in order to support your partner. For example, develop a balanced diet plan that takes care of your partner’s nutritional requirements, but do not forget to add your favourite dish to the equation!

Consult with your doctor to plan an evening out, away from the regular routine. Understand and follow the doctor’s instructions when it comes to dos and don’ts for eating and drinking on your evening out, and you will be fine.

Make sure to have a backup for yourself. As you support your partner in living with Diabetes, you need not give up your interests. Have family/friends provide you with backup whenever you need to step away for some time. This also takes care of the condition known as “compassion fatigue” in caregivers.

It is also good to have support of other people living with this condition just in case you yourself are under the weather for a couple of days.

To read more on Diabetes, click on the link below.

Diabetes

Checklist & Tips for Diabetics by Famhealth

Checklist with Tips

Diabetics

For Patients

Here’s a quick guide for keeping a daily check on diabetes by patients/family and caregivers.
Self-help is the best help and we are with you.

  • Check blood sugar levels as often as recommended by your doctor. By checking your blood glucose level, you can know how food, physical activity and medicine affect your blood glucose.
  • Inspect your feet daily for cuts, injuries, blisters, infection and changes in skin pigmentation.
  • Inspect your mouth, teeth and gums. People living with diabetes often are prone to periodontal gum diseases, doctors’ advice brushing twice daily and flossing once in a week.
  • Check for infection, cuts, blisters, or colour changes all over the body including your underarms, groin area, area between toes, etc.
  • As you may be already aware, people with diabetes must avoid hot water baths as hot baths often lead to wrinkling and blisters in skin.
  • Keep your supplies close: Make an attractive kit bag and keep all the necessary medications and food items within your reach. Replenish the kit daily to keep your energy elevated, and blood glucose levels normal.
  • Last but not the least take your medications on time and at least exercise or walk for a minimum 45 minutes daily to regulate blood glucose levels.

For the Caregiver
 

  • Blood sugar check – Check or gently remind them about the blood sugar check as per doctor’s recommendation
  • Keep a record – keeping a daily record of his/her blood glucose readings, medicine schedule, exercise, meals, and how the person feels helps in managing diabetes.
  • Check the colour of the person’s legs and feet – check for signs such as swelling, warmth, redness, or pain. These may be signs of an infection so see a doctor right away as recommended by Joslin Diabetes Center.
  • Check the temperature – Cleveland clinic recommends you, to check the temperature of the water your patient is going to take a bath. Water should be just warm (not hot). Encourage usage of only mild soap such as glycerine soaps to prevent wrinkling and cutting of skin tissues.
  • Check on hydration – Drinking lots of fluids — like water, juices, caffeine-free and sugar-free drinks are very important to keeping them hydrated. So we recommend you, just try to keep reminding them.
  • Check their diet plan – Encourage them to eat small but frequent meals, If they are not following, try to encourage them to change their diet, we suggest you to eat the same food as them and encourage by following their diet.
  • Check the way they exercise – Offer to exercise with him or her to motivate them. Let them decide what they like most outside or indoor exercises always check with the doctor before starting any regime.
  • Check on their Oral hygiene – As we know, that a person with diabetes is more likely to have mouth related problems. We suggest them to brush with a soft-bristled brush after every meal, and floss at least once a week.

To read more on Diabetes, click on the link below.

Diabetes

I’m a borderline case, what can I expect ?

Have you been diagnosed with borderline high blood sugar levels? In your case the blood sugar levels recorded are higher than normal, but not high enough to be full-fledged Diabetes. This is referred to as the Prediabetes stage which can be reversed by following recommended guidelines.

During this phase, your pancreatic cells are still producing a little amount of insulin to convert carbohydrates into sugar, however, Insulin produced by the pancreas is not sufficient to remove sugars effectively, keeping the blood glucose level high.

It has been observed that people with Prediabetes may not take this condition seriously. However, research suggests that the sooner one begins to take precautions, the better are the chances of reversal of this condition.

 

 

Some quick tips

  • Make small changes and be a winner!
    • Prediabetes can eventually lead to Type 2 Diabetes; however, this development can be easily prevented. It requires small efforts and minor changes in your lifestyle. Research shows that reducing your body weight by just 5 -10 %, to begin with, makes a remarkable difference in the natural Insulin production in the body. Weight loss can also delay the onset of Type 2 Diabetes significantly.
  • Watch your portion sizes
    • Dieticians round the globe suggest having 3 main meals and 3 mini meals to have a good control of your glucose levels.
      You may choose to use smaller plates for meals to check on serving portions to begin with. The plate method advocated by ADA is specially designed for people living with Diabetes or Prediabetes. This approach advises that you fill half of your plate with fibrous fruits and vegetables; one quarter with low carbohydrates, such as brown rice or a baked potato; and the last quarter should be lean protein, like grilled fish or chicken.
  • Never skip meals
    • Eat regularly. It is always a good idea to follow a regular meal pattern and not skip meals. People who eat regular meals, beginning with healthy breakfast, are healthier, more energetic and weigh less than those who skip meals.
      Consume mini meals. Eating healthy mini meals and snacks such as fruits, multigrain bars and low-calorie preparations help you to not only control your blood sugar, but also hunger pangs and prevents you from overeating and binging.
  • Limit tobacco and alcohol consumption
    • Research suggests smoking may aggravate complications from Diabetes, such as heart diseases and may lead to nerve and kidney damage. It is, therefore, highly advisable to significantly limit or give up on smoking. 
      Alcohol consumption can have a strong impact on your blood sugar levels; they often spike blood glucose levels leading to poor diabetes management. It is a good idea to take your doctor’s advice on whether you can consume alcohol, and how much. In any case, please remember to always eat a snack or a meal while consuming alcohol to prevent fluctuations or spiking of blood glucose levels.
  • Exercise
    • Exercise is integral to a healthy lifestyle. If you have been diagnosed with Prediabetes, it is even more essential for you to have a fitness routine. 
      It is a good idea to check with your doctor before you starting any exercise program. However, a daily walk of 30 – 45 minutes usually makes a good starting point. You may also choose from a wide variety of exercise regimes such as Yoga, Pilates, Tai chi, Swimming, Dancing and Jogging.
  • Acquire as much information as you can
    • It is believed an informed person can make better decisions. Hence we urge you to make an effort to learn about food and lifestyle changes that will help you manage your condition better.
  • Take help and support from your family
    • Research suggests that it is easier to manage Diabetes more effectively with family support. Your partner, family, and friends can play a huge role in motivating you and helping you adhere to your diabetes management programme. 
      It is a good idea to check with your doctor before you starting any exercise program. However, a daily walk of 30 – 45 minutes usually makes a good starting point. You may also choose from a wide variety of exercise regimes such as Yoga, Pilates, Tai chi, Swimming, Dancing and Jogging.
  • Last but not the least
    • Always maintain a positive approach. Studies suggest that people who consider Prediabetes as a burden or stress are often unsuccessful in managing this condition. Hence, with a positive mind and attitude you can successfully control your blood glucose levels and come on top of your condition.

What I can do as family/friend of a diagnosed Prediabetes?

Studies reveal that a majority of partners and family members may be equally worried upon detection of their partner’s Prediabetes/Borderline condition. But the good news is that you and your family can play a very important role in arresting and reversing the condition. Research suggests, Partners and family members who actively take interest in managing Prediabetes/borderline condition with in their spouses have been very successful in achieving excellent results.

You may already know that Prediabetes is a warning condition, but studies are on our side saying the condition can be reversed by bringing in lifestyle changes and following low carb diets, exercise regimes and incorporating lifestyle changes.

  • Equip yourself first
    • Reading and collecting information on diabetes yourself can be very helpful for you to understand what your partner is going through physically and emotionally. You may also choose to take guidance from a certified diabetic educator or a physician to help your partner in the best possible ways.
  • Support your partner mentally and emotionally
    • Psychologists suggest that people living with Prediabetes/Diabetes undergo tremendous emotional turmoil. Feelings such as anxiety, fear, guilt, anger, frustration and denial are bound to be experienced. As a family member / partner you should try to be supporting and understanding of these emotional ups and downs. You are also advised to consult a certified diabetic educator to help you motivate your partner in dealing with this condition.
  • Participate in arresting Prediabetes/borderline condition
    • It is always easier to approach a challenge as two people rather than one. By working together not only are you motivating yourself but you are also acting as a check for the other person. Planning goals together is very helpful in attaining successful results, it is a good idea to discuss and chalk out plans mutually before starting to follow any regime for management of this condition. Research suggests that partners, who ate the same food, and did combine exercises yielded better results than self-managed programmes. 
      Reminding your partner to adhere to the Prediabetes management programme may help in controlling high glucose levels in people with Borderline conditions. You may also choose to follow “eating by the plate method” advocated by ADA and try various diets. 
      However, it is important to beware that constant nagging, complaining or forcing may backfire in managing this condition. It’s advisable to set realistic goals, and handle situations compassionately.
  • Empower and replenish yourself
    • Research shows family and partners undergo tremendous mental and physical fatigue. Remember to take care of yourself too, because you may also undergo mental and physical stress while looking after your companion. 
      Ensure that you have time for yourself and for pursuing the interests you enjoyed before Diabetes made an appearance in your life. Pamper yourself and remain cheerful. 
      It is important to strike a balance in order to manage your personal and professional life. Set realistic goals and do not give up. Eat a well-balanced healthy diet and learn different ways to cope up with stress. To know more read the below tips to manage compassion.

To read more on Diabetes, click on the link below.

Diabetes

Compliance and Checklist

Compliance and Checklist for Diabetes

Compliance and Checklist for Diabetes by Famhealth

Despite significant modern advances in diagnosis and treatment of diabetes, compliance still remains the most crucial aspect of blood glucose level control. Scientific research in National Institute Health USA, suggests “Poor glycaemic control may be reflected by both the failure of diabetes self-management by patients as well as inadequate intervention strategies by clinicians”. Hence identifying the barriers in compliance and treatment adherence is an equally important aspect for successful diabetes management.

Barriers in compliances may be due to various reasons but as per research the majority of non-compliances in diabetes management could be due to In-adequate information, Cultural differences, Religious beliefs, Family dynamics, Emotional imbalances, and sometimes poor communication skills.

According to the American Diabetes Association, The major compliance regimen for people living with Diabetes includes:

  • On time Medications:
    • Medications on time, helps you to maintain a “good control” of blood glucose levels in your body. People living with diabetes are often prescribed multiple medications for diabetes and other co morbid conditions. 
      To ease your medicinal intake you are advised to check with your doctor on the sequence of medicines to be consumed as per priority for e.g. which medications to consume before/after meals. 
      To manage and ensure medicinal compliance you are encouraged to take the help of friends/family/colleagues who can effectively remind you to take your medications on time every time!
  • Food & Nutrition:
    • According to Dr. Mona registered dietician from USA says, “Good food is good medicine and bad food is bad medicine”. You are advised to have frequent diabetes friendly meals, to reap the maximum benefits of successful diabetes management. To know more refer to our Food section.
  • Exercise regimen:
    • Regimen: Having a daily exercise regime not only helps you to stay fit and healthy, but has also helped so many people in reversing their conditions remarkably! At Famhealth exercising can never get boring! Get to know the new forms and join our community to experience fun “do it with us” exercising modules.
  • Monitoring blood glucose levels:
    • Checking your blood glucose levels timely as recommended by your doctor helps to administer the effect of food, medicines and physical activity in your body. It is almost a reflection of how well you are managing your condition. You are encouraged to take help of your partner/family member/caregivers to learn the right ways of monitoring blood glucose levels to ensure diabetes compliance.

Family/friends/caregivers play a vital role in helping a person living with diabetes to overcome all the barriers and come on top their conditions

  • Check blood sugar levels as often as recommended by your doctor. By checking your blood glucose level, you can know how food, physical activity and medicine affect your blood glucose.
  • Inspect your feet daily for cuts, injuries, blisters, infection and changes in skin pigmentation.
  • Inspect your mouth, teeth and gums. People living with diabetes often are prone to periodontal gum diseases, doctors’ advice brushing twice daily and flossing once in a week.
  • Check for infection, cuts, blisters, or colour changes all over the body including your underarms, groin area, area between toes, etc.
  • As you may be already aware, people with diabetes must avoid hot water baths as hot baths often lead to wrinkling and blisters in skin.
  • Keep your supplies close: Make an attractive kit bag and keep all the necessary medications and food items within your reach. Replenish the kit daily to keep your energy elevated, and blood glucose levels normal.
  • Last but not the least take your medications on time and at least exercise or walk for a minimum 45 minutes daily to regulate blood glucose levels.

Non adherence to the above treatment compliances often leads to frustration in families and also in doctors treating diabetes individuals

Diabetes Types & symptoms

Diabetes Recipe – Chicken with Cherry-Pepper Relish

Diabetes Recipe - Chicken with Cherry-Pepper Relish

Preparation :20 Minutes

Cooking :8 Minutes

Serves :4

Ingredients

  • Olive oil 1 tablespoon
  • 4 small skinless, boneless chicken breast halves (1 to 1¼ pounds total)
  • 1/3 cup bottled roasted red bell peppers, drained and finely chopped
  • 1/3 cup frozen unsweetened pitted dark sweet cherries, finely chopped1-ounce semisoft cheddar cheese crumbled
  • 1 tablespoon snipped fresh garlic chives

Directions

  • Coat an unheated large non-stick frying pan with cooking oil; heat over medium flame. Sprinkle chicken with ¼ teaspoon each salt and black pepper. Add chicken to the frying pan. Cook for 8 to 10 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink (165o), turning once.
  • Meanwhile, in a bowl stir together the roasted peppers, cherries and 1/8 teaspoon salt.
  • Transfer chicken to 4 serving plates. Top with a pepper-cherry mixture, cheddar and garlic chives.
Nutrition Facts
Makes 4 servings (Amount per Serving)
Calories (Kcal)  124
Protein (g) 18
Carbohydrates (g) 4
Total Sugars (g) 2
Dietary Fibre (g) 2
Total Fat (g) 2
Saturated Fat (g) 324

Note

Remember to manage your portion sizes. Recommended portion size should not exceed 2 servings/helpings. Consuming diabetes friendly recipes in inappropriate portion sizes may lead to spiking of your blood glucose levels.

For more related recipes, click the link below.

http://famhealth.in/infocus-detail/diabetes

Diabetes Recipe – Tropical Banana Freeze

Diabetes: Tropical banana freeze by Famhealth

Serves: 4, Time taken: 10 minutes plus 1-hour freezing

Nutrition Facts
Makes 4 Servings (Amount per Serving)
Calories (kcal) 189.8
Protein (g) 2.3
Carbohydrates (g) 33.6
Total Sugars (g) 17.4
Dietary Fibre (g) 3.8
Fat (g) 7.2
Saturated Fat (g) 5.2

1 tbsp Grated fresh, frozen or desiccated coconut4 Bananas, peeled

1 tbsp Sesame seeds

100ml/3 fl oz Coconut milk

1 tbsp Honey

1 Lime, juice only

Steps:

  1. Slice the bananas into 2.5cm/1” pieces, lay them on a baking tray and freeze until hard (at least one hour)
  2. Dry fry the coconut and sesame seeds, stirring frequently, until browned
  3. Just before serving, take the bananas from the freezer and place in the blender with the coconut milk, honey and lime juice. Blend until smooth. Serve in small glass bowls, garnished with the toasted coconut and sesame seeds.

Note

The Glycaemic Load (GL) of banana depends on the variety of banana, where it was grown, and most importantly, how ripe it is. Choose slightly underripe bananas and the GL can be low as 11, and even the mean of 10 studies was only 12.

For more related recipes, click the link below.

Diabetes

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